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Linda
03-06-2003, 09:59 PM
I came across this picture today of my grandmother, Emma Harris. The side lighting really shows her face. She's the one who told her girls that we are 'related to a Blackfoot chief." So I guess you could say, she's the grandmother of the Saponitown website.

http://www.saponitown.com/images/EmmaHarris.jpg

vance hawkins
03-07-2003, 09:08 AM
Did she give the name of the Chief? When, where did she say that? What else did she say?

She was a pretty lady.

vance

Linda
03-07-2003, 12:18 PM
This was something she told her girls during the depression. She died not too long after, in her early fifties. That one line is all we have.

There was a Saponi/Tutelo Chief Harris who went with some twenty braves to Joseph Brandt during the Revolutionary War. I believe it was Horatio Hale's informant, the alleged "Last of the Tutelo" who reported this bit of history. The document is in the archives in DC. Something I want to look into someday.

techteach
03-10-2003, 08:44 AM
Linda:
I guess you could say that the picture I attached is the reason I joined this forum. This is my gggrandfather whose mother has the headstone that reads "Blackfoot". I don't have a picture of her.
To see this, I was not sure if I needed to attach the image or embed it in the html code. I attached it.

Cindy

http://www.saponitown.com/images/Ralston.jpg

techteach
03-10-2003, 10:07 AM
My picture file was too large, so I will need to reduce it before I can upload.

Cindy

techteach
03-14-2003, 09:38 AM
I found the time to try to upload the picture of my gggrandfather, son of my grandmother who had the Blackfoot headstone. I will see if this works.

Linda
03-14-2003, 10:21 PM
Just email it to me if you're having trouble and I'll resize it.

techteach
03-15-2003, 09:41 AM
It is turning into more work than I expected. I made the picture file smaller myself, but uploaded it as an attachment the last time I tried. I got no error message about size problems that time. You must need to embed it in the html code to show it. Since I have already fiddled with it this far, sure, I will send it in an email. The photo would represent my gggrandfather, who would be half Blackfoot.

Cindy

Linda
03-15-2003, 10:29 AM
Sorry for your trouble. I embedded it above. One of the files you sent me wouldn't read as a .jpg for some reason, likely why you had trouble. Pictures CAN be a bother. They can be added here as either an attachment or embedded, but embedding's more work, though better, since we'll have ongoing access to the photo. As an attachment it's just part of the database and we couldn't call on it if, say, we wanted to do a Photo Album page, with all our family photos someday.

But go ahead and use the attachment if it will accept it. I just have to remember to grab the picture and save it to our images folder so we don't lose track of it.

techteach
07-17-2003, 12:29 PM
Linda:

Are you connected to the Harris family found at this web site?

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~confido/hindex.htm

Just curious. They connect with my ancestors and the side of the family that is known to be native.

BTW, I did not know that my gggrandfather's picture got posted successfully. His mother is the person who called herself Blackfoot.

Cindy

Linda
07-17-2003, 06:15 PM
I see some common name combinations. My Harrises were in Ohio for a decade or two, but I don't know where. We first pick them up on the census in PA (1810), though the family lore is that they derived in Virginia.

Where's your connection with these Harrises?

techteach
07-17-2003, 06:28 PM
Linda:
I see the names Sinkey and Green in this Harris book. Sinkey was my ggggrandmother's maiden name and Green was her grandmother's maiden name. The location in the online Harris book is Licking County, Ohio as was the location of my Sinkeys and Greens.
Incidentally, 4 or 5 brothers and sisters in Green line came from Berkeley County, VA (now WVA) around 1792 to 1803, settled mainly in Licking County, Ohio, and then a bunch of them went on to Iowa in 1842. Sound a little like your history?

Cindy

Linda
07-17-2003, 09:30 PM
Yes, it does. I just looked at Cousin Ada's genealogy and can't find anybody in Licking County. I thought I'd seen that, maybe I just missed it, but now I'm seeing mostly Hocking, some Ross and Columbiana County, OH. And there's Louisa County, Iowa. Wabash County IL, Sullivan County, IN. Berkeley County, WV.

My husband has a lot of Greens, who are still in Brunswick County, VA (Greentown). Of course, here, we're not dealing with any kind of hard evidence when it comes to a connection, just those mischievous matchmakers who put us together raising my curiosity. I don't think I've mentioned here that he's learned that some of these Brunswick county cousins were taught they were Blackfoot.

Two other branches of this same line of Greentown cousins have carried the oral tradition that they're "Sioux." I thought that couldn't be a memory, but the word was first recorded in the 1600's and WAS known on the east coast, so I don't think anymore that it's impossible they knew to call themselves this.

techteach
07-18-2003, 07:15 AM
Linda:
The Greens in my family were from Berkeley County, WVA. They lived on the banks of the Opequon River and bought their land from Lord Fairfax as surveyed by George Washington. The family genealogists believe that they were Shawnee, as there were Shawnee towns in the location of their land. The Sinkeys were from Huntington County, PA. Both ended in Licking County, OH. I think they were both mixed communities. Pictures of the family in "The Green Tree", written about the Licking County family appear this way. The Blackfoot did not come from this line, as far as I know. They intermarried with that mixed family (Ralston) in Iowa. The Ralstons were originally from near Pittsburgh. I always wonder if there was something more than coincidence that brought both mixed families to the same location in Iowa. The only connections I have found is that both families were acquainted with members of the Zane family and both had family members who fought in the Revolution.
But there were members of that online Harris family from the same location. My cousin, who wrote a book on hidden native American families, thinks that the family who lived around Johnstown in Licking County, were hidden Shawnee. The Green family first bought the Wyandot village of Raccoontown (part of Johnstown) and lived amicably among them when they first left VA for OH.

Cindy

Linda
07-18-2003, 12:22 PM
I had Ulms in Berkeley. Mathias, who was from Berks, PA and from a family of good Lutherans who left a paper trail of christenings etc, all the way back to 1500s in Germany, was the huisband, the wife was named Naomi, no last name known. I wonder about them. Most Ulms were very visible with paper trails, but there's very little known about Mathias's family. His son John moved to Ross County Ohio and married Elizabeth Smith. All we know about her is that she came from VA. Around 1823 they moved to Sullivan, IN, where they appear to have raised their family. That's the county, I believe, where the "Blackfoot Church" is known to have been. Vance knows more about that. So that line of the family has some intriguing tidbits pointing to the family tradition of being Blackfoot.

There was a church in Berkeley County VA (later WV) called the "Tuscarora Church." I've heard the Tuscarora Path passed through there (which lots of Indian group leaving the southeast used).

I have a rough copy of a photo of Ellen Ulm, born in Sullivan, IN, and a better picture of a son who seems to resemble her. He has a very round face with a prominent brow ridge that reminds me of a friend of mine at Six Nations who's Tuscarora. He told me that bony forehead trait was Indian.

I believe it was around the mid 18th century that both the Saponi and Tuscarora were thrown in together around Indian Woods in Bertie County, NC. It seems to be hard to tell them apart following that.

I've been thinking about that post from Heather back in November in the "Blackfoot" section. She reports that her grandfather taught her they were from Fort Christanna and they were called Blackfoot because they burned the fields before they planted. I know other people feel that that's what the name signifies, but I've balked at that, since all Woodland Indians did the same thing.

But now it's occurring to me that maybe this is a name that caught on, starting in VA/NC, to describe the relatively assimilated Indian people who were pretty much living within the mainstream economy, except for certain tell tale traits, the burning of fields being one prominent difference. Also, I'm beginning to think this was an amalgam group. From all the names of families I've heard from, the Saponi/Siouan influence seems the most prominent, but there are enough names felt to belong to other tribal groups as well. They all seem to have that mid-18th century eastern VA/NC borderline area in common.

techteach
07-18-2003, 03:20 PM
My Blackfoot ggggrandmother came from PA, specifically Beaver County. There was a town there called Logstown that sat on a well-traveled Indian path. She was an orphan according to family lore. Someone, Bess, I think it was, said that that town was mixed Shawnee, Tutelo and Delaware.
As I said before, I find it interesting how my two groups ended in the same place. I wonder if there was some type of pipeline of information about where mixed peoples could safely settle as they moved west. I read a master's thesis over the winter about an Indian agent known to encourage Indians to buy their landwho initially surveyed the area in Iowa that my family settled in. His name was the same as some of my ancestors, so I thought there might be a clue there, but nothing. My ggggrandfather had two wives and the children of the first one, the white wife, returned to PA.
I went to school with families whose names were those I have named on this forum. I specifically remember one classmate whose grandmother had been a member of the Sinkey family but his family had nothing to do with that family, as my family had nothing to do with that family (I did not know at the time that they were related to me.) I always thought it was because they lived in the country and acted kind of backwoodsy. Now I think it was rejection of the Indian heritage for both families. And I think that this family's culture was simply retaining some of its native elements. However, I do not know if they burned the fields before planting. My German father did though, and there is not a bit of native heritage there.