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Thread: Big jake Troxel - Cornblossom

  1. #1
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    Big jake Troxel - Cornblossom

    Hello,

    I am new to this forum, and first wish to thank the hosts!

    Big problem for us is, Big Jake Troxell supposedly married the daughter of Doublehead.

    Does anyone have first hand proof Cornblossom ever existed?

    Every source we have followed ends at the same person, and we have dated the appearance of Cornblossom between 1991 and 1994. Before then it seems she never existed.

    We never heard of the Thunderbolt Chickamauga until about the same time-frame. And then next we heard about the Laurel Mountain Thunderbolt Chickamauaga?

    Can anyone specifically prove the adults who died at the Yahoo Falls Massacre?

    It is known Tuckahoe left Margaret Mounce 1821 and returned to the Cherokee. He left behind one son, and one daughter, but so far as we can discern nobody knows their names. Margaret Mounce married Elisha Roberts 30 Jan 1821 in Wayne County Kentucky accoring to Kentucky Marriage Records. The couple can be documented in 1860 and 1870 Census records in Pulaski County Kentucky proving Elisha b. 1798 and Margaret b. 1800.

    Big Jake Troxell married Elizabeth Chartier 1781 in Pennsylvania after his service in the Revolutionary War. He married Elizabeth Brewer 22 Nov 1806, in either Pennsylvania or Maryland. He last married Elizabeth Blevins Steele.

    Elizabeth Brewer either died or left Jake before March 20, 1823 when he married Elizabeth Blevins Steel, widow of Christian Steel who she married April 12, 1806 in Wayne County, Kentucky (Richard Barrier ... Bondsman for the Steele-Blevins marriage).

    This Elizabeth attempted to continue Jake's Pension for his Revolutionary War Service after his decease. Elizabeth Blevins Steel was born 1796 Morgan, Ashe County, North Carolina. She was the daughter of Wells Blevins, and Elizabeth Armstrong ... married 22 May 1789 in Patrick County, Virginia. Jake and Elizabeth Blevins Steel had one daughter.

    We have accounted for every child born to Jake and his three wives, and all of them survived by at least 20 years the event that supposedly took place at Yahoo Falls, Kentucky 1810.

    It seems people are confused about War Chief Peter Troxell. He was the bastard son of David Troxell and Elizabeth Chartier. Elizabeth was the grandaughter of Peter Chartier, a Canadian Fur Trader who married a Pekowi Woman. Peter Troxell is the man who married Jenny Stevenson (Standing Fern) 16 Jan 1803 in Wayne County, Kentucky (marriage record is extant).

    Anyone have any ideas about all of this?

    Thanx,

    tlagvga
    Tlagvga

  2. #2
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    Hi, Tlagvga,
    Vance Hawkins on the "Share Historical Research" portion of this forum may be able to help you with questions on the Chickamaga, Yahoo Falls and has some research sources on the subject of Doublehead's family and possibly has some thoughts about Cornblossom.

    Is the MOUNCE girl's father the John MOUNTZ (spelling variation) in 1820 Wayne Co a few houses from William ROBERTS?
    Bill

  3. #3
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    Hello Bill,

    The Margaret Mounce who married Elisha Roberts is the daugher of John Mounce Jr., which is the brother of Margaret Mounce who married Tuckahoe. So far as we have determined, nobody has been able to establish an accurate date of when the Margaret - Tuckahoe union occurred.

    We think the 1820 Census record of your interest proves to be the Son of John Mounce, John Mounce Jr. The 1860 & 1870 Census proves Margaret & Elisha still living, which should prove Margaret as the daughter of John Mounce Jr.

    Thanx for the info on the other forum.

    tlagvga
    Tlagvga

  4. #4
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    howdy --

    I don't go to work until tomorrow, so I have one more day of vacation time.

    i.] Once upon a time I believed all that stuff. I saw the genealogies, and saw a Rainwater mentioned. well they married into my Arkansas family, and also one Rainwater was the pastor at my great grandparents wedding.

    I was all excited. I also saw the Brock website talking about Jessee Brock, whose father was "Aaron Brock aka "Red Bird". He too says his ancestor viewed the Yahoo Falls Massacre. Doublehead was Sequoyah's (whose English name was George Guess) Uncle and and my great great grandma was Hariet Guess. So I was interested in all this.

    2. I contacted these websites and people were frinedly at first. But I kept asking questions and they quit being so friendly. One reason I started Chickamauga research yahoo group was to find out which stories were true and which weren't.

    I contacted a professional archaeologist who was employed in Wayne County, Ky and who works for Daniel Boone National forest and he referred me to a local historian. Oh, he said there is no physical evidence, and there never has been any physical evidence of a massacre at the falls.

    I asked the local historian, who told me he was a descendant of the Slaven family, which is too a family mentioned in those genealogies and stories on those websites. He questioned those Troxell tales before I did. He said he'd been a long time employee of the forest service, and was raised in/near Daniel Boone National Forest in Wayne County, as his father worked there before him.

    There seem to be three books at the origin of these tales -- one by Robert Collins (no relation to the Melungeon or Saponi Collinses), one by Thomas Troxell entitled "Legion of the Lost Mine", and "Legend of the Che Nee People". People xeroxed the last 2 and I purchased then, and i obtained the first from a library loan program. None of the 3 provide primary source documentation for the events they portray.

    According to the historian from Wayne County, there was no Cornblossom, or Tuckahoe, and no Yahoo Falls Massacre. Acording to Cherokee history written by the Cherokee themselves, there was no Cornblossom, no Tuckahoe, and no Yahoo Falls Massacre. There is no historical documentation in any newspaper of the era, no government document, and there is no Cherokee record either of any of this.

    Doublehead never lived in this region, but he lived in the Cherokee Nation where he also died. The wife he is given in those stories is also not proven and is most likely mythical as well. Thomas Troxell mentions in the forward of his book that some characters are "fictitious" but his relative Dan Troxell on his website assumes it is all true. And in the original homas Troxell book there is no mention of a Yahoo Falls Massacre. That was introduced by Collins.

    Tankersley adds his mythical version by saying his "Red Bird" was killed with an unknown Cherokee after the Yahoo Falls massacre. However there is a Red Bird who was killed in 1797 -- a decade and a half before the date of that so-called massacre, messing up Tankersley's family timeline severly. One more thing. His ancestor Jessee Brock whom he claims is a Cherokee, was living as a pretty close neighbor to one of my ancestor in the late 1790s -- in lower Scott County, Virginia. If Jessee was Indian, he was most likely Saponi like the rest of us here, seein as how he lived in that community. and NOT in the Cherokee Nation. And that Redbird River in Kentucky might as likely be associated with the Sizemore's "Red Rird" as with the Cherokee who was killed in S Ky by that name in 1797.

    There was a Cherokee named "Red Bird" whose name was on a treaty or 2, but there is no evidence he was ever in Kentucky as was the one killed there in 1797 (while on a hunting trip -- he too lived in the Cheroke Nation, and not in Ky).

    I read that when the first settlers came to the region around wayne county, they found Indians living there. There are several ways to take this. i.] They stumbled upon a hunting party and mistook them for permanent settlers. ii.] Outlaw Cherokee were sometimes told to live in the hunting grounds, being banned from the settlements. Doublehead was NOT an outlaw at this time and was not banished from the nation). iii.] This is just 2 counties west of the Melungeon settlements near Greasy Rock. So perhaps they were Piedmont Siouan and not Cherokee, who ventured further west at an earlier date. iv.] It is possible the Cherokee gave permission for some group to live there, such as the Yuchi/Euchee.

    Fake histories are bad for many reasons. The Cherokee have always said these stories are not true, and have also said they might be Indian but from another tribe. It is time to believe what they have always said, I think.

    One book and author that has it in the right perspective is Samuel D. Perry and his book South Fork Country is an excellent source for honest REAL stories about the history of that part of the Country. It is possible individual Cherokee families DID emigrate there about the time of the removal, or just before or after it.

    But this has nothing to do with Doublehead at all. He had daughters who married the Chickasaw Colbert's, and their descendants are enrolled Chickasaw today. Bird Doublehead was given the honor of killing one of the Ridges after the removal, since he'd been instrumebntal in the killing of Doublehead in 1807 at Hiwasee, NOT near Doublehead's so-called cave in Ky. Bird Doublehead's known descendants travelled the trail of Tears and are enrolled in the Cherokee Nation today. If you bring this topic up today amongst the Cherokee and ask them, they'll tell you "Cornblossom" is a silly name as corn doesn't bloom ad the conversation will probably end right there.

    Thank you for your question. I used to get pelted with rocks and rotten eggs on other message sites when I'd bring this topic up, but more and more people are learning what really happend, and that is great.

    vance

  5. #5
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    Hello Vance,

    Thank you for a most excellent and thoughtful response.

    My heritage is truly mixed - Cherokee, Shawnee, Osage, Navajo, Zuni, and Hopi - those six we have documented and proved without doubt, and most likely we have some of the lesser-known eastern tribes as well. My immigrant direct line starts in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia ... with a family of eight siblings all-migrating to the New Land as early as 1634 at Jamestown. Later arrivals up to 1682 included many cousins, aunts, and uncles to Pennsylvania and Virginia.

    My language skills are barely adequate to put a few words together in a couple of native tongues, but for the life of me, in no way could we ever put Cornblossom together in Cherokee, or Shawnee. We are familiar with the Tankersly information and it appears to us he is "in the game only for the money." His claim to fame is via the Benge family, but we quickly dispensed with that claim since a very close personal friend of our family is a McLemore (distant relative of Chief Robert Benge), who does have a nearly complete record for that line. We are also very close friends with a Vincent Hobbs direct down line grandson whose grand pappy shot and killed Robert. Fact is, the three of us live within two miles of one another, and are of the same generation. Our ages are 61, 64, and 73 years. So far, nothing but good will amongst us.

    Run After McLemore is the reason for the McLemore family locating in Missouri. She passed directly through here on the Trail of Tears 1838, and then wrote a letter telling her family in Tennessee and Kentucky to "move to Missouri." That letter in the McLemore family archives and was dated January 1839 at Tahlequah. The McLemore family also has a picture of Run After, and her youngest daughter Catherine b 1832.

    We have copies of the letters between Governors Sevier and Garrard concerning the murders of Red Bird and Will 1797, including the Order by Sever issued to the Sheriff to arrest Ned Mitchell and John Livingston (correct spelling). I think there is a copy of another letter we have, which notifies the Cherokee people about the murders also.

    According to the McLemore family records, John McLemore who died 1844 at Knoxville Tennessee was a close personal friend of the oldest son of Red Bird murdered 1797, and signed two Treaties with him. 1) Treaty of Tellico October 1805 signed as Tochuwor. 2) Treaty of Washington D.C. January 1806 signed as Redbird. The Treaty of 1805 at Tellico he signed as a warrior, and was ranking man in the area affected which was then without a Chief. The Treaty of Washington D.C. he signed as Redbird for he had been elected or appointed Chief by a delegation, what delegation and where, we have never been able to validate outside the McLemore family archives. There are some records of Return J. Meigs which everyone knows is missing, and he would have most likely have been the one to give such advice to the local people. We also know the two men went to Washington D.C. with John Greenwood (Sour Mush). The three men allowed seven days from Knoxville to Washington D.C., a distance of more than 450 miles. We are not sure but have a bit of information that causes us to think Meigs made the trip with them. We do know the three men made an agreement between them never to sign another treaty afterward. And to our knowledge, none did.

    The source for most of this information is a family diary kept by John McLemore’s wife, Sarah Carnes. No doubt the Carnes name will ring someone’s bell! That family must be the most difficult family to trace that ever existed! On second thought, the Briggs family could be even worse. The McLemore men started marrying Native women with the first émigrés son, James who married direct into the Gilliam family. That James married Fortune Gilliam. Consecutive McLemore men then married Gilliam, Briggs, Edward, Clanton, Carnes and other known full and mixed blood women.

    One thing we have learned about the McLemore line, most people have it terribly wrong. Run After had several brothers and sisters, and all of them but two married whites. The only two that married Indian were Run After born 1783 the youngest, and Happy, the oldest who was born circa 1756. They were the daughters of Robert McLemore, the son of Charles McLemore and Quatsis Greenwood. Quatsis was the daughter of Chief Caesar (Thomas) Greenwood and Katie (Shawnee woman). Robert signed the Treaty of Holston July 2, 1791 as Robin McLemore, and according to the diary, nobody could figure out how to say “Robert” in Cherokee.

    Again, many thanks for the information. We just want to be sure Cornblossom never existed just in case we step on someone’s toes inadvertently.

    Before I forget, the Will killed with Red Bird 1797 was Chief Will of Akoha who signed the Treaty of Hopewell November 28, 1785.
    Tlagvga

  6. #6
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    well I'd like to thank you as well for that information. You had some info I didn't have. Sometimes I get all in a huff about someting and get real zealous, and research it just to shut somebody up who seems too (or so i think) "uppity" or arrogant or a "know it all" and Tankersley fit the bill, so I really went to town on this topic. I even went after the grissle and I normally wouldn't touch that.

    I found some of that info about Red Bird on a website called http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/?Welcome

    go there then click on "peoples and culture"

    scroll down to

    "Southeastern Native American Documents, 1730-1842 "

    and click on it. At the "search" option write in "Redbird" and much of what you said will pop up. But if I recall it right it never mentioned the name of the person killed with Red Bird, so I appreciate hearing about that. You can search for all kinds of things at that site. And I never knew who the person who signed those treaties as "Red Bird" was, but since I read one Redbird died in 1797, well i supposed it wasn't him. Deducin' that took some smarts, didn't it?

    I thought it interesting how careful those governors wrote the Cherokee Nation about those two murders. They didn't want a war to erupt over it, considering the old blood laws & all. So if there was an 1811 massacre of children, don't you think people woulda been upset enough to act on that, especially since that was the timeframe the Creek Red Sticks were getting all worked up, Tecumseh was travelling around trying to get tribes to unite with him, et cetera. Such a horrible massacre might have turned the tide and taken the Cherokee down a different path, don't ya think? They might have allied themselves with the Red Sticks and then what would have become of Andy Jackson? Well ya never know.

    What you said about the Troxells was interesting, too. I'd heard they came from Pennsylvania, but that's all I knew really. You filled in a lot. thanks.

    Tlagvga, there are some people here that are very knowledgeable about Maryland, Virginia, and neighboring states. I'm a beginner when it comes to researching them and have learned a lot here. They may be able to help you. I have found reading history helps me to understand migration patterns, as a great many Indians from the east Coast ended up in Oklahoma (where my family ended up) or the Six nations or elsewhere, and much to my lack of knowledge, many remained right where they were. If you provide a few surnames, some people here will be very helpful.

    vance

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    Hello Vance,

    We use the Georgia Galileo site for documentation on occasion, and find it an excellent source. Our copies came from the University of Georgia, which does house the Archives on the Galileo site.

    Frankly I have never understand how a preponderant event such as the Yahoo Falls Massacre as described could have went without local people of all colors raising an uproar. Killing adult men is one thing, but mass execution of women and children is an entirely different subject. Even in 1810 we seriously doubt that Governor Scott or Attorney General Blair would have allowed the event to go without taking some action. And methinks the local Indians would have screamed long and loud, loud enough for a certain Shawnee Chief to make a move ... and for those people who don't know everything, Panther-in-the-Sky once said-

    "Give me 1000 strong warriors and we can take Washington!"

    When he said it 1800, my money would have been on Tecumseh!

    Had he ever amassed an army, Tecumseh was probably one of the better, if not the best Indian military tactician that ever lived. Of course the Plains Indians had some great leaders, as well as the Comanche and Apache. What we have learned is, the Great Chiefs were almost always Great Statesman too.

    I find it interesting you have Guess Ancestors, but strangely not because of Sequoyah. My interest is in a George Guess b. circa 1705 Bath County, North Carolina. His father was Laurens De Gues b. 1637 Metz, , Nord-Pas-DE-Calais, France. George Guess dropped the De, and added an "S" to become George Guess. He spoke English, French, Cherokee, Choctaw, Shawnee, and a host of Mississippi Indian languages. He was a horse trader, and made a fortune trading horses with anyone who wanted a horse. He has been tracked to the Rocky Mountains before 1725, and to Alamogordo New Mexico by 1730. He never married, or had a wife that anyone can prove, and he supposedly was a friend of every Indian he ever met. His father immigrated 1671 to Delaware from France when about age 34 years. His mother was a Powhatan woman who his father took to wife around 1680. His father died Bath, North Carolina 1722. According to his partner, George died 1765 when trying to cross the Tennessee River somewhere south of the Georgia-Tennessee border.

    Do you have any information on this particular George Guess?

    He was supposed to have several brothers and sisters, but we have never been able to document a single one. This George Guess had a son we have documented with a Pawnee woman 1741-42 in what is now Eastern Kansas. We know he provided some of the first horses to several Eastern and Southern tribes, at least some of those not stolen from the Spaniards in Florida, or the new white settlers.

    Too bad he was not born sooner. Just think, 1000 mounted warriors against the militia units so common among the early settlers. Things today might be a bit different todqy.

    Thank you,
    Tlagvga

  8. #8
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    http://www.saponitown.com/forum/show...5&pagenumber=1

    A photo of my ancestor Hariet Huess Brown (@1818-1886) is found in the 2nd post here. I said then the baby in Hariet's arms was my great grandma, but I really am not certain. She had 2 younger sisters burn as late as 1857. Maybe it was one of them.

    There are 2 family stories that I know of. Dad (1915-1992) went by his grandma's house on the way to school. He said often he stopped there before returning home. He only had an 8th grade education, but in the 6th 7th or 8th grade, i don't know which, he took Oklahoma History. he said his grandma saw a picture of an "Indian" in his Oklahoma History book and said (paraphrasing) to him, 'You know you are related to him?" hat's all I recall dad sayin'." Well, when I got older, and he got older, I wanted to know more (too bad I didn't ask more at the time we were both younger). One day I found that famous painting of Sequoyah, with the pipe, turban, and syllabry. I asked him if that was the man in the Oklahoma History book his grandma said we were related to. All dad ever said tho was, "I don't remember."

    Now only one of dad's sisters, the youngest, is still alive. about 2000 or 2001 I wrote her and asked her what she knew of the story we were related to Sequoyah. Her reply was that her grandma didn't tell her anyhting about it. well Aunt Lorena was born 1925 and G-grandma Josie died in 1932, so that is understandable. ut she told me her mother had mentioned it, and said as she remembered she was told her great-grandma (who was Hariet Guess Brown) was "Sequoyah's niece or great niece." I remember and know my Uncles and might have called my great uncles "Uncle" too, but I ever would have thought of doing that in reverse, that is calling a uncle, a great uncle. So I suspect great uncle for that reason, and not uncle. If that was the case, then Hariet's father would have been a "nephew." Now this is if the family story is true, and we can't prove it.

    On the emigration rolls it says Sequoyah came to Arkansas with a party of 11 from Willstown, and Toochelar if my memory is correct, was Chief of Willstown and he was a well known Arkansas Chief. I have wondered who the other 10 were wo came with Sequoyah. here was a Thomas Gist in 1828 at Nicks Township which was about 7 miles from Sequoyah's cabin in Sequoyah County, Ok. My relations were in that area in the 1870s according to Indian/Pioneer Papers.

    In N Alabama there are several families of Gists who all have stories of Indian ancestry who can't quite be tied to Sequoyah and mine appear to have come from there. On 1850 census hariet Guess Brown said she was born in Alabama, in 1860 & 70 she said Tennessee and in 1880 she says Georgia. To confuse it more, her daughter (My great grandma) on 1900 census of the Chickasaw Nation (where they'd moved to) said her mother was born in Mississippi. She says this on 1910 and 1920 Oklahoma census records as well.

    I think she said Mississippi because they were in the Chckasaw Nation and were thinking of Dawes in 1900, and to be enrolled they had to have lived where the Chickasaw were. But then they never signed up for Dawes, so we are ot on accepted or rejected Dawes. I think Harriet was probably born near where Ga, Tn and Al meet. Since she was born 1818 and moved to Arkansas she might not have known exactly where in the East she was born, so to make sure and get it right she named all possible states . . . one of 'em's gotta be right . . . But I am guessing as to why. we might not ever find out, I don't know, but I am gonna keep looking.

    vance

  9. #9
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    I have heard it said Sequoyah's father was Nathaniel Gist or a german peddler named George Guess. I tthis prson you are referring to the 2nd, George Guess? I have never heard anything else about him, and have wondered about him.

    I'd like to know more about him.

    vance

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    Tla gv ga
    Is your Peter Troxell the same as the one on the 1800 Pulaski Co., Ky Tax List?
    Is this the line from earlier Frederick Co., Md and Huntingdon and Northampton Co., Pa.?
    Bill

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    Hello Vance,

    I totally understand the memory problems with people that endured the relocation process, and the down line children who did not know or were never told where or when, of family matters. We once thought our gg-grandmother was full blood but recently several family records owned by my great aunt who died 1982 firmly established she was Cherokee-Shawnee-White Metis.

    I was fortunate to spend an entire summer with my grandfather 1953. He was then 68, me 11, and he instilled within me a love for our heritage. He told me, "It is not what you think of yourself that proves character; it is what others think about you that is your character." I try to remember his words daily.

    Yes, the information we have starts with the emigree, and it is his son George Guess who was the horse trader. I will dig out the information we have on him and try to get it posted in the next few days.

    Thank you,
    Tlagvga

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    Hello Bill,

    Yes, the original emigree was Peter Troxell to Pennsylvania, then Maryland, and some of his children moved to Virginia. He and his wife had eight children, all very well documented. Big Jake's father was David, but Peter, Jake's half-brother was a bastard son born to David and a Shawnee-French Metis woman of the Chartier family. David and his wife had seven children, and David's wife raised Peter as her own son. Big Jake was their first child.
    Tlagvga

  13. #13
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    Thanks for that info on the Troxells.

    I think there were a lot of mixed-blood people who went west will the first settlers and I think many of these for what ever reason, have clung to the idea their "Indian" ancestor was Cherokee, when quite often they were not.

    vance

  14. #14
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    Hello Vance,

    An aspect we have often wondered about is by 1840 how many Eastern full blood Indians remained of their respective tribes. I also wonder if anyone has done such a study?

    My gg-grandfather was a US Marshall in Indian Territory Oklahoma from 1870 to 1875 before he moved to Texas. We have some of his thoughts recorded in letters which makes a person wonder the why of relocation was ever allowed.

    Yesterday the Associated Press issued a press release concening historical documentation for the Trail of Tears, and emphasized the "lack of accurate record keeping" rampant during removal. Follows is a copy of the Original Release from the Associated Press ... Please note: We looked but could not find a Copyright notice, but anyone so using it should verify Copyright usage prior to use.
    ---------------

    "By Jeffrey McMurray, Associated Press Writer June 29, 2005

    WASHINGTON --The tale is true. The trail is sometimes false. History has documented the plight of American Indians evicted from Southern communities in the 1830s and forced on a deadly journey toward Oklahoma. However, official recognition of the path of some 15,000 Cherokees was often based more on guesswork than evidence.

    Now the records are starting to catch up with the story. Several lawmakers demanded on Wednesday that the Interior Department do a better job retracing the Cherokees' route along the Trail of Tears.

    "The Trail of Tears is a tragic story, but it is very much an integral part of American history," said Rep. Zach Wamp, a Tennessee Republican who introduced legislation late Tuesday seeking a comprehensive review of the trail. "We need to document it better. We need to interpret it better."

    When Congress made the pathway a national historical trail in 1987, research was limited. Historians have since uncovered glaring omissions: There were no routes in North Carolina or Georgia, even though up to three-quarters of the Cherokees likely started from those states.

    The official trail markers also leave out two major arteries in Arkansas and water routes in eastern Tennessee.

    "It is unacceptable that such a critical part of our history remains a patchwork of missing pieces," said Rep. Marion Berry, D-Ark., a co-sponsor.

    The Trail of Tears Documentation Act would direct the Interior Department to review the new evidence and complete the historical picture through markers and other forms of recognition.

    In 1830 when President Andrew Jackson sought to remove the tribes, most lawmakers were mum. Davy Crockett was the lone Tennessee congressman to oppose the plans and lost re-election as a result.

    Many white settlers who replaced the Cherokees were motivated by the search for gold. But "the gold was the Cherokee people," said Jack Baker, president of the Trail of Tears Association.

    Removal of the culturally advanced Cherokees was a huge loss to the region, Baker said.

    Current Cherokee leaders brought a modern scroll to Wednesday's news conference. Stretching across a committee room, it listed the names of Indians who petitioned the government in vain in 1830s to stop the removal.

    Chadwick Smith, principal chief of the Cherokee Nation, said one-quarter of the Cherokees died before reaching Oklahoma and called their plight a "travesty of justice, sham of public policy, and disdain for human dignity." He said he hoped the bill would prevent such actions in the future.

    Duane King, executive director of the Southwest Museum of the American Indian, said a more complete picture of the story has emerged from studying eyewitness accounts, military journals, payment vouchers and newspaper stories and it's time to incorporate that into public recognition.

    "We are still struggling to understand why it happened, how it affected the people involved and its importance on American political thought and justice," King said.
    ------
    The bill is H.R. 3085."

    -------------------------------

    Now, if we could only do something about Andrew Jackson.
    Tlagvga

  15. #15
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    Tlagvga --

    there is a book --

    Dianna Everett, The Texas Cherokees: A People between Two Fires, 1819-1840 (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1990).

    =========

    I have read it alhto I don't have a copy. I got it through library loan. I recall it mentioning government reports of a count of just how many Indians remained East of the Mississippi -- the government kept these records. They seem to have ignored mixed-blood communities which still existed. The number was very low, just a handful. Since I don't have the book any more all I can say is I recall reading it in that book.

    It reminded me of them patting themselves on the back for finally succeeding in achieving the "final solution" to the "Indian problem".

    Vance

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