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Thread: Martha Stephens Rogers and Hester Rogers

  1. #46
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    Sep 2002
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    He remembers Shawnee words. And his father's nickname turned out to be Shawnee for Frog.

    Techteach

  2. #47
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    Nov 2005
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    Elkhorn, Wisconsin
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    Hello Dovelady,

    I have been doing a little research on the Metis, the name for the mixed blood people of Canada. We have discussed the naming of children by our ancestors and wondered if the names reflected their heritage. My great-great-grandfather Dean Rogers was a Metis. He was born in Canada and migrated to Iowa. He named his youngest daughter Madlen, a variation of Madeleine.

    Madeleine was an extremely popular name among the Metis. There was even a town named Madeleine in Canada which consisted of twenty Metis families.

    I did some additional research and discovered that the naming of children in Algonquian cultures had great spiritual significance. For example, in Cree and Ojibwa communities, the parents hosted a feast at a child's first birthday for the purpose of naming him or her. Grandfathers and grandmothers were considered to have great spiritual power and were asked in many instances to name the child.

    My own great-great-grandfather Dean Rogers was probably named in this way. Dean is a family surname, which was probably chosen for him by his grandmother or grandfather.

    Dean chose the name Madlen for his own daughter because it reflects his strong heritage as a mixed-blood Metis.
    Gussie

  3. #48
    Hello and thank you for the interesting information.

    I know that in many cultures, and especially some NA peoples, name changes happened when something important happened or changed in their lives. That is another reason that people who are researching NA ancestors often have trouble tracing them.

  4. #49
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    Nov 2005
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    "They should make excellent slaves, since it appears that they have no religion whatsoever."
    Christopher Columbus, on his first contact with New World aboriginals, 1493

    First, Columbus did not discover America. The indigenous people had been living here for tens of thousands of years prior to 1492.

    Second, the depth and mystery of Native American spirituality is completely lacking in many contemporary "religions." Christopher Columbus had no innate spirituality and no soul.
    Gussie

  5. #50
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    May 2005
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    Southern Alabama on Perdido Bay
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    Rogers

    I know this is a long shot but something to think about. I am a Rogers as well...well at least my mother is LOL anyway we are from North Carolina and our Rogers line is Tuscarora. Anyway after the Tuscarora War in the early 1700's many headed north to New York. After the American Revolution many went into Canada because they sided with the British I have been told. Being that Dean Rogers came into Iowa from Canada several decades after the Revolution I wonder if this is the same Rogers family? Just something to think about.
    Linda

  6. #51
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    Nov 2005
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    Elkhorn, Wisconsin
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    From the weekly newspaper, the Fort Madison Iowa Democrat, Wednesday, October 31, 1877:

    DIED

    At his home in this city, on Friday, Oct. 26, 1877, Dean Rogers, aged 67 years.

    Dean Rogers was born in Stanstead, Lower Canada, on the 17th of January, 1810. He came to Iowa in 1837 and settled in Burlington. From Burlington he came to Fort Madison some twenty years or more ago with his family, where he has since resided. He was married in Rome, Iowa, to Miss Martha Stephens, and his wife is still living, and four children, daughters, all of whom, we believe, were present at the funeral of their father, which occurred last Sunday.

    Mr. Rogers was made a Free Mason in 1841, in Burlington Lodge No. 4, if we are not misinformed. He was once master of his lodge, we believe. On his removal here he became a member of Claypoole Lodge No. 13 and remained so till his death. He was buried with Masonic honors, with a full attendance of his brethren here and some from neighboring lodges.

    The following resolutions of respect to the memory of Bro. Dean Rogers were passed by Claypoole Lodge No. 13 A.F. & A.M.

    WHEREAS, it has pleased the almighty ruler of the universe to remove from us by the hand of death, our well loved brother, Dean Rogers, who has been for many years, a member of Lodge No. 13, A.F. & A.M., of Fort Madison. Therefore:

    Resolved. By his brethren, that in the death of Bro. Dean Rogers, we mourn the loss of a faithful brother, a tried craftsman and a true Mason, and that while we bow in humble submission to the will of the Great Grand Master, we will ever cherish the memory of our brother whose demise has draped our lodge in mourning.

    Resolved. That our brother's widow and family, have our sincere sympathy and heartfelt condolence in this their hour of bereavement and sorrow.

    Resolved. That these brethren of Claypoole Lodge No. 13, wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty days, in honor of the memory of our deceased brother.

    Resolved. That the resolutions be spread upon the minutes of the lodge and that the Grand Master present a copy thereof to the widow and family of Bro. Rogers.

    The above obituary of Dean Rogers was found on microfilm in the Fort Madison Public Library. He was born in Stanstead, Quebec, Canada, which is directly on the Quebec/Vermont border. Stanstead was settled in the early 1800s by Loyalists from Vermont and New Hampshire because of the offer of free land.

    In my research in Fort Madison, I found no obituary for Dean's widow Martha or his daughter Hester. His obituary did not mention where he was buried, and I could not find a cemetery record. I am contacting the Free Masons, as they may still maintain these records and will know where he is buried.

    Thanks to everyone for all your invaluable help and assistance!
    Gussie

  7. #52
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    Bowles ancestry from Virginia

    My great-great-great-grandmother Elizabeth Bowles was born in 1777 in Virginia. Bowles is a surname sometimes associated with the Cherokees. For example, Chief Bowles, who was killed in the battle of the Neches in East Texas, 164 years ago, was a Cherokee.

    Many of the names in my background, such as Rogers, Stephens, Bowles, and Dean, cut across tribal lines. Rogers, Stephens, Bowles, and Dean are just some of the surnames of the European settlers who intermarried with the native peoples. Intermarriage with the Europeans occurred among all tribes, so these European surnames are therefore associated with all of the eastern Canadian and United States tribes.

    How can one tell from which tribe one is descended, if the name Rogers, for example, could be either Cherokee or Choctaw? Where an ancestor was born does not answer this question, because of the nomadic nature of our ancestors. Also, many of the tribes lived in such close proximity that it seems impossible to ever determine from what tribe one's ancestors came.
    Gussie

  8. #53
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    William Augustus Bowles

    Another interesting and colorful English explorer named Bowles was William Augustus Bowles. He was born in 1763 to a wealthy Maryland Tory family. He had a superior education, excelling in chemistry, music, art and acting. During his lifetime, he had two wives, a Cherokee and a Hitchiti Creek, daughter of the famous Chief Perryman. Two of his sons with these wives became leaders of the Creek and Cherokee during the Trail of Tears.

    He was the war leader of a five-nation confederacy called "the nation of Muskogee" and fought the Floridians. He also was a Freemason. The 1795 records of the Grand Lodge of England show he was the duly accredited provincial Grandmaster of the Five Nations. Two chiefs, Chief Bowl of the Cherokee Nation and Chief Bowlegs of the Seminole Nation, are descendants of William Augustus Bowles.
    Gussie

  9. #54
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    Gussie,
    Would you please cite the sources for this information? This could prove to be important.
    Bill

  10. #55
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    Bill,

    There are two sources for this information:

    http://www.tfn.net/~cdk901/wabowles.htm

    are.as.wvu.edu/minges.htm

    Let me know if you have any further questions.
    Gussie

  11. #56
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    Bev, could you check that last link? It didn't come up.

  12. #57
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    Nov 2005
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    Elkhorn, Wisconsin
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    Linda,

    The second link is http://are.as.wvu.edu/minges.htm. Let me know if this works for you.
    Gussie

  13. #58
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    Nov 2005
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    Elkhorn, Wisconsin
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    Patriots War, 1837-1838

    My great-great-grandfather, Dean Rogers, left Stanstead, Lower Canada (now Quebec) in 1837. This date coincides with the Patriots War, which was largely a revolt by French Canadians in Lower Canada against British rule. These types of rebellions occurred in both Lower Canada and Upper Canada. The revolts in both Upper and Lower Canada were ultimately defeated by the British. The United States remained neutral towards these conflicts. In order to better assimilate the French Canadians, the British government in 1840 passed the Act of Union, uniting Upper and Lower Canada. Now I know the significance of the date 1837. It was a time of armed revolt in Canada, and many people took this opportunity to migrate to the United States, which remained neutral.
    Gussie

  14. #59
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    Nov 2005
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    Elkhorn, Wisconsin
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    After a long search, I have found Hester Rogers' grave. She is buried in a cemetery which previously told me they had no record of her. I decided to re-contact them and, to my surprise, they said they had discovered some old records from the 1800s and she was among them. Ironically, they found these records in an old vault one year ago, about the same time I joined the Saponitown forum. I saw the records, which are remarkably detailed, even including her doctor's name.

    I visited her grave. She is in an area of the cemetery with 15 graves, only five of which have headstones. Ten of the graves are unmarked, including Hester's. She is in a very beautiful area.

    I am designing a headstone for her, to reflect and memorialize her Native American heritage. If I had given up and not re-contacted this cemetery, I might never have found her. Cemeteries can lose paper records and, without a headstone, an ancestor might never be found.

    If our ancestors are in unmarked graves, it is our responsibility to place headstones on their graves. If we do not, who will? The alternative is losing them forever. Having found Hester, I am now more confident that I will find her parents' graves.
    Gussie

  15. #60
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    Nov 2005
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    Surnames Scott, Stephens, Ayers and Brown

    The following link has interesting information regarding the Catawba and the Saponi in connection with the surnames Scott, Stephens, Ayers and Brown:

    http://sciway3.net/clark/freemoors/CatawbaRec.html

    In describing the history of the Catawba, the site states:

    "1733, some Saponie Indians, accompanied by some Cheraws, returned to Virginia from the Catawba lands, petitioned Lt. Governor Gooch for permission to settle in Virginia, which was granted (Merrell 1989:116)

    Fact) The surnames Scott, Stephens, Ayers & Brown were commonly documented among the Catawba Nation in the years 1790-1830.

    Fact) The founders of the mixed-blood populace at Scott's Ferry [South Carolina] and Scott Town had the surnames of Scott, Stephens, Ayers & Brown."
    Gussie

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