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Thread: Martha Stephens Rogers and Hester Rogers

  1. #61
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    If you are traveling in northeast Iowa, don't miss Effigy Mounds National Monument, which contains 191 prehistoric, Paleo-Indian mounds, 31 in the form of bears and birds, and the remainder in conical or linear shapes. There are 14 miles of walking trails located in this national park, which overlooks the Mississippi and Wisconsin Rivers. The mounds were constructed, starting 2,500 years ago, as ceremonial and sacred sites, by the Paleo-Indians of what is now northeast Iowa.

    My husband and I stopped here on our way back to Wisconsin from Fort Madison, Iowa, in September. The park is located three miles north of Marquette, Iowa, in extreme northeast Iowa. The trail we took during our visit was the Fire Point Trail, a 2-mile hike past a number of beautiful effigy mounds (all with detailed description markers), including the "Little Bear Mound" (my favorite).

    The Fire Point Trail leads directly to 300-foot high bluffs overlooking the confluence of the Mississippi and Wisconsin Rivers. We took some great photos of the truly spectacular drop from these steep cliffs to the rivers below.

    The park is open year-round and is a must-see for anyone interested in Native American history in Iowa and the ceremonial practices of our earliest ancestors. Also, you can take your leashed dog on all of the trails!
    Gussie

  2. #62
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    I noticed that the Saponitown home page mentions that migration routes in the U.S. have been established as far west as Iowa. I discovered that my ggggrandfather Emmor Jefferson Stephens made the arduous, cross-country trek from Virginia to Portland, Oregon, dying in Portland in 1846. Emmor is the father of my gggrandmother, Martha Stephens Rogers. I have ordered a book written by a Stephens cousin which contains rare photos of Dean and Martha Rogers. When I receive this book, I will share these photos.

    Can anyone document a similar migration pattern in the U.S. from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean in the mid-1800s by an ancestor? I know there were some settlements in Alberta, Canada, but I have not read of a cross-country migration from Virginia to Portland, Oregon, as early as the mid-1800s.
    Gussie

  3. #63
    Hi Bev, my people's migration route is: NC>TN>IN>WI>IA>and Nebraska in the 1800's. But then my Grandmother moved out here to Oregon with my Grandfather around 1930 or so. Most of our people stayed in Iowa or Nebraska, but this small family splinter came out here and spent time in Oregon and California.

    Our family names are: Harding,Carey,Groat,Dunn,Williams,

  4. #64
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    Can anyone document a similar migration pattern in the U.S. from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean in the mid-1800s by an ancestor?
    You probably meant, can anybody on this forum... but in case the question is more general, I imagine lots of people in Oregon can. The Oregon Trail in its broader sense included a lot of southeastern folks; and given their habits back east, I'd imagine our Blackfoot sort would have been what became known as Webfoots, out there. Farmers in the swampy land, more than cowboys. I don't really know much about it, but have been (lightly) exposed to that history. You might look for this book:

    Jones, Suzi. 1980. Webfoots and Bunchgrassers: Folk Art of the Oregon Country. Portland: Oregon Arts Commission.

    I used to know Suzi, and I think her historical introduction to this exhibit catalog was very good.

  5. #65
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    Thank you both for your replies. I know you live in Oregon, Barb, but I see your ancestors came in the 1930s.

    Thanks, PappyDick, for the description of the book, which I will check out.

    I still am curious if anyone on this forum has a story of a direct ancestor reaching the West Coast in the mid-1800s.

    I know that my ggggrandfather Emmor Jefferson Stephens was one of the first settlers of Portland, Oregon.
    Gussie

  6. #66
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    There is a lot of information on this forum about finding our ancestors through NA registries. However, this may not always be the best place to look. Many Native Americans and mixed people deliberately chose not to sign Federal Registry rolls and to not indicate their race, or alternatively indicate it as "white," on birth certificates and other public documents.

    Faced with forced removal and possible coercion onto a reservation, both Native Americans and mixed people wished, first and foremost, to maintain their independence. In order to accomplish this, many of our NA and mixed ancestors concealed their race on public documents and refused to sign NA Registry rolls. In other words, many of our ancestors deliberately denied their NA ancestry.

    Not finding an ancestor listed as NA on a public document or not finding an ancestor listed on a NA Registry roll is meaningless in itself. This ancestor may have deliberately chosen to hide his race in order to preserve his future independence.

    For additional information, please see "The Genealogy of a Medicine Man" at:

    http://www.nativeamericanchurch.net/genealogy.html
    Gussie

  7. #67
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    Water Divination or Dowsing

    The history of Vermont includes Welsh settlers intermarrying with Native Americans of the Abenaki nation. My gggrandfather, Dean Rogers, had both Welsh and Native American ancestry. He was born in 1810 in Stanstead, Quebec, Canada, which is located directly on the border of Stanstead and the town of Derby, Vermont. His parents likely were lured to Canada from Vermont in the early 1800s by the offer of free land. This is how Canada enticed Loyalists from New England to leave the United States and settle in Lower Canada after the Revolutionary War. My ancestor Dean Rogers subsequently left Canada at the age of 27 and settled in Iowa.

    The Abenaki nation can be documented for thousands of years in Vermont's history. They had a long tradition of water divination, or dowsing, which they passed from generation to generation. Similarly, early Welsh settlers in Vermont brought their own skills in dowsing to the New World. When the Welsh intermarried with the Abenaki nation, they combined their various skills in water divination.

    Does anyone know the history of water divination among the Saponi or other tribes?
    Gussie

  8. #68
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    In 1824, the first mixed blood reserve in Iowa, the Sac-Fox Half Breed Tract, was established. An 1824 treaty with the Sac-Fox Indians of Iowa set aside land for their mixed blood relatives. This reserve, in Lee County, Iowa, was a triangular piece of land consisting of 119,000 acres. The Tract encompassed the city of Fort Madison, Iowa, in which my gggrandparents settled in the early 1840s. Lots in this Tract were not assigned until October 6, 1841.

    Additional Half Breed Tracts were subsequently created in Missouri (for the mixed blood Osage), Minnesota (for the mixed blood Dakota), Nebraska (for the mixed blood Sioux and Otoe), and Kansas (for the mixed blood Kansa).

    What is today a blatantly pejorative term, the designation "half breed" was in common use in the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries for the mixed bloods in both the United States and Canada. Other terms in common use were "breed," "half-caste," and "half man." The use of the word "half" in "half breed," "half-caste," and "half man" shows the extremely prejudiced notion that a mixed blood individual was some sort of half human-half bestial hybrid.

    My gggrandmother Martha Stephens was born in Virginia and my gggrandfather Dean Rogers was born in Stanstead, Lower Canada (now Quebec). They were mixed bloods unrelated to the Sac-Fox Indians. My speculation is that they may have been attracted to the possibility of acquiring land in this Half Breed Tract in Iowa. The treaties creating these five Half Breed Tracts had been negotiated with specific NA tribes indigenous to Iowa, Missouri, Minnesota, Nebraska, and Kansas. However, I have read that these reserves attracted mixed bloods from many other areas throughout both Canada and the United States. I am curious if the assignment of land in any of these five tracts was ever extended to non-indigenous mixed bloods. I have no personal knowledge that my gggrandparents ever acquired land in the Iowa Tract.
    Gussie

  9. #69
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    I can attest that mixed bloods went elsewhere in IA also. My folks were near Maquoketa. I read an original document that said that many of the Sac and Fox hid in the hills of eastern IA up until the 1840's. I think that they sheltered my folks who were Shawnee from OH and WV. The two tribes spoke virtually the same language. That is why my grandmother said that our ancestors were Fox. However, they did not come from areas where the Fox were found. And there is a town just south of Dubuque, about 20 miles from where my folks settled called Shawondasse. I googled this word and found it to be the accepted name of the Shawnee tribe.
    The Indian agent from Prairie Du Chien had a name that is a Nanticoke surname, Street. (It is a name in my famiy also.) His family came originally from VA. He surveyed the eastern part of IA in 1830 before he became the Indian agent. He was so well liked that he is buried near Chief Wapello.

    Techteach

  10. #70
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    This is a photo of my gggrandfather Dean Rogers, which was taken in 1876. The occasion was his 35th wedding anniversary. The prior photo of Martha Stephens Rogers was also taken in 1876 on this anniversary.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Dean Rogers Crop.jpg 
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    Gussie

  11. #71
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    Hi Techteach,

    Please post the photos of your earliest ancestors who settled in Iowa. The three photos I have already posted of Dean, Martha and Hester were taken in the 1870s.

    The earliest photos are the best, so please post the earliest photos you have of your NA and mixed blood ancestors.

    Thanks.
    Gussie

  12. #72
    Hello Bev,
    Nice meeting you,Iam the Rogers family's from VA ,KY
    My 5th greatgrandfather is Charles Rogers born 1761 VA and died May 24,1814 Bourbon Co,Ky ....I do not know where his buried at ......
    Charles married Susannah Smith her father was Withers Smith ,she born Stafford Co,Va
    I thought maybe you relative to us?

  13. #73
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    Hello,

    Thanks for your reply. My gggrandfather Dean Rogers was born in 1810, in Stanstead, Lower Canada (now Quebec). When he died in Fort Madison, Iowa, in 1877, his newspaper obituary did not give the first names of either of his parents. Neither did the obituary reveal his burial place. There does not seem to be a connection to your Rogers ancestors unless my gggrandfather's ancestors were originally from Virginia. I have no way to prove or disprove this because I do not know the first names of his parents. The trail is cold without this information.

    Concerning your Smith ancestors, there is a Smith connection in my family, as well. My ggrandmother Hester Rogers married Thomas Fitzgerald in Fort Madison, Iowa, in 1863. They had five children, including my grandfather James Fitzgerald. In 1897, James Fitzgerald married my grandmother, Mary Elizabeth Sawyer, in Fort Madison, Iowa. Mary Elizabeth Sawyer, born in 1874 in Bonaparte, Iowa, was the daughter of Richard and Georgiana (Smith) Sawyer. I have not yet traced by ggrandmother, Georgiana Smith, but the Smith family had very strong roots in Fort Madison, Iowa.
    Gussie

  14. #74
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    In researching the surname Rogers in early Colonial America and Canada, I have noted that many of them were Quakers. For example, Timothy Rogers recruited 27 Quaker families in Vermont to come to Ontario, Canada, in 1801, to settle a Quaker community. He had first presented this idea at a Quaker Meeting in Windsor County, Vermont, where he lived.

    I have also learned, from a variety of sources, that the only people who treated NAs with dignity and respect were the Quakers and the Swedes. Everyone else treated the Native Peoples with contempt and hostility in order to drive them from their lands.

    On another topic, I have discovered an interesting book, "Suspect Relations: Sex, Race, and Resistance in Colonial North Carolina," by Kirsten Fischer, published in 2002 (265 pages with illustrations). To quote a book review by Melanie Perreault, "Colonial North Carolina was not exactly a typical example of English social order in the seventeenth century. With a reputation as a bit of an outlaw society, the colony seemed to attract disorderly settlers, including debtors from other colonies and religious dissidents such as Quakers. The presence of a significant Native American population with their own notions of gender practices only exacerbated the sense of a society free from the fetters of traditional power hierarchies. Colonial authorities, determined to assert control even in the absence of political and economic stability, gave heightened attention to perceived gender transgressions. Their first target was intercultural sex between English men and Native American women."

    Kirsten Fischer researched court records of the time in writing her book. Because poor whites, Native Americans, and African Americans of the period recorded almost nothing about their views on sex and race, actual court proceedings are the best evidence of how they were treated by the society in which they lived with respect to race, class, and gender. This book is available at Amazon.com.

    Techteach, I am disappointed, as I am certain everyone is, that we have yet to see photos of your ancestors. As they say, "A picture is worth a thousand words!" Please post them!
    Gussie

  15. #75
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    Speaking of Swedes and Indians, some of you might be interested in the work of Gunlög Fur, a professor at Växjö University in Sweden who got her PhD at the U of Oklahoma and has published a good bit in English. I knew her very slightly when she was a student, and for some reason have her vita on my desktop -- will paste in a paragraph about her interests:


    Research interests primarily focus on Native American history and especially on different aspects of cultural encounters during the early modern period. In my dissertation I looked at Swedish relations with Lenape Indians in the New Sweden colony on the Delaware River in the middle of the 17th century. These relations were compared to Swedish contacts with Saamis during the same period in order to analyze the impact of the encounters with indigenous populations on Swedish policies. Since then I have studied different perceptions and practices concerning gender and sexuality in colonial encounters in North America and Northern Scandinavia. While cultural encounters can and do occur everywhere in the world, in all times, my emphasis is on the period in which indigenous peoples around the world came into contact with European travel, trade, and settlement. Although I have mostly researched periods prior to 1800 it is apparent that notions formed during the early modern period significantly influence present-day perceptions regarding race and culture as well as academic divisions. History and anthropology as disciplines, and formations of knowledge, have become important objects of analysis in my continued work. My present research projects consist of finishing a book length manuscript on Delaware Indians, gender, and cultural encounters, and on studying Saami women’s presence and participation in local court proceedings in the Swedish Lappmarks during the 17th and 18th centuries.

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