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Thread: Known Catawba Surnames.

  1. #1
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    Known Catawba Surnames.

    This is all the Known Catawba names which I've been able to find in my research.

    May help some people out there.


    http://www.ianwatson.org/catawba_ind...alogy_2004.pdf

    I figured it would be easier to just add a link to the stuff

    http://sciway3.net/clark/freemoors/CatawbaRec.html

  2. #2
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    That is the stuff that the Federally recognized Catawba tribe will NOT tell you.


    For those that does not know....The Catawba tribe of 1760 was given 15 miles of land.....currently the Catawba tribe of SC has gotten land because of the 1760 treaty however only allows a very very very small ammount of the desendants of the 1760 tribal members to have access to that land.

    The tribe currently can not explaine why they do notallow the majority of the desendants membership.

    But yes the above two links will show you who REALLY is the Catawba tribe.

  3. #3

    Harris' in Kentucky

    Would you know if any of the Harris' moved into the SE Kentucky or NE Tennessee area? I have a Nann (Nancy?) Harris born around 1845, unknown birth place. I can't seem to find anything about her. Thanks, Reba

  4. #4
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    I'm not too sure......but I'm sure there was some....in 1760 a treaty was made with the USA govt and the Catawba tribe...this gave them 15 miles of land.....by 1820 only 1 mile of that land was left.....also by 1820 about 85 percent of the Catawba was not found around that original 15 miles of land...it was stated that 85 percent of the Catawba was unaccountable in 1820....apprently living conditions in that area was bad so most of the tribe had to migrate to other areas.

    Some of the Catawba was found living on the Poarch Creek reservation in Alabama by around 1830.

    I actually have a image of one of the Catawba Harris' that was in the war.

    York county Sc and Rutherford NC are two of the known locations the Catawba had traveled to.......also one of the tribe that became part of the Catawba nation was found in Occaneechi town.

  5. #5
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    I also would like to add that the Catawba and the Saponi not only was known for living together but also known to marry each other.....so anywhere you find known Saponi areas, it is safe to say that the Catawba could have been found there as well.

  6. #6
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    Here is a Article which includes the Harris Family.....The Peter Harris from South Carolina is the one I was talking about as me having a painting of.


    The Guineas of West Virginia
    A Transcript of A Presentation at First Union
    July 25, 1997, Wise Virginia
    by
    Joanne Johnson Smith & Florence Kennedy Barnett


    Our people are known as the Guineas. The earliest family names prior to 1800 are Male, Norris, Dorton, Harris, Canaday, Newman and Croston.


    The men have fought and died in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812 and the Civil War, and all of those thereafter.


    I believe each of our people has the name Male as an ancestor. Some of the other names we may or may not have. There are four names that most of us go back to in our lineage. They are Gustavis Croston, Henry Dorton, Sam Norris and Wilmore Male.


    He earliest Male in our direct line that have located is Wilmore Male. Wilmore signed a petition in Maryland in 1768 to move the county seat from Joppa to Baltimore Town. Sometime after that, he and his family moved to Berkeley County, Virginia and by 1782 they had moved west to Hampshire County, Virginia. Sam Norris was already there.


    According to our oral history, Sam's mother was an English girl named Elizabeth Norris. She was the daughter of William Norris of Monongalia County., Virginia who also had two sons. William Norris captured a young Cherokee boy traveling north with a party of Cherokees--the Draper Manuscripts state there was a party of Cherokees traveling in the area about this time. William named the boy Sam. Elizabeth, who was called Betsy, and Sam had to go get the cows in the evening, and guess what? Betsy got pregnant. As the story goes, Betsy's brothers took Sam into the mountains and killed him. I do know that William Norris had two sons and a daughter named Elizabeth. I have a copy of his will and he left Elizabeth out. Of course we know why. Betsy gave birth to a son in 1750, and she named him Sam, after his father. In 1764, Sam left the Monongalia County area with a family by the name of Gaul. They went to the present county of Barbour, West Virginia. Betsy followed and hacked off approximately 1,625 acres of land. She thought she had 750. She got a deed and put it in Sam's name. I have found the land grant settlement which is in Sam Norris' name. Sam had lost about 600 acres of the land according to the grant. While here, Sam married a Delaware woman named Pretty Hair--also according to the Draper Manuscripts and the Horn Papers there were Delaware living in the Morgantown region at this time.


    Sam and Pretty Hair started their family on what was later called Hackers Creek, named after a white man who had settled there by the name of John Hacker. It was around this time that the Males arrived in the area: Wilmore Male, his wife and children.


    The Males and Norrises intermarried early, along with the Dorton, Harris, Newman, Croston, and Canaday families.


    Prior to 1800, all of these families were listed as white, starting with a census they took in 1782, one in 1784, and the first U.S. Census in 1790. In the 1810 census they were listed as Free Persons of Color or Mulatto. There were times when someone in the same family would be listed as white, and the rest of the family as Mulatto.


    Another example is the Harris family, beginning with Peter and Billy Harris. Oral history states that they were Cherokee Indian. In the Draper Manuscripts there is a Peter and Billy Harris in Virginia that fought in the Revolutionary War. They came from the Carolinas and were Catawba Indians. I would have to believe these are our Peter and Billy but on the census they are listed as Mulatto. Whether they were Cherokee or Catawba, we do know they were Native American.



  7. #7
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    After 1800, other names began appearing and marrying within our people: Collins, Parsons, Pritchard, and Goins to name a few. Around 1840, the Adams and Minards (Minerds) started marrying our people.


    Our people settled in Ohio in the early 1800's and there a few more names appeared. Over the years they have migrated to several states.


    There are many stories about our people which have been written and told, some true, some not. One of my favorites is in the West Virginia history when a group of Indians attacked the settlers on Hackers Creek and killed some and ran others off. Our oral history states that Sam Norris watched from his porch as this took place. The Indians were supposed to be our Grandmother Pretty Hair's people. As I mentioned before, Sam was the first man to settle here and this was his land. The settlers were probably told to leave and didn't, so Grandmother's people took them out.


    Florence Barnett will give you the presentation of our family names.


    ...I know you may have heard or read different explanations as to where we originated. Remember that not everything that is in print is necessarily true. We would like you to keep an open mind as we, the Guineas, tell you about ourselves, since we know more about our heritage than anyone else.



    Now I'm going to tell you what we have learned from our oral tradition and 20 or more years of research. Nothing we say is infallible, and if anyone has something to add to our research please share it.


    The father of the Male line in West Virginia (Wilmore) came to America in 1765 from England with his wife and several children. We first find him signing a petition to remove the county seat from Joppa to Baltimore Town, Maryland in 1768. Next he is found on the census in 1784 and 1790 living in Hampshire County, Virginia. He and his family were listed on the census as 10 white souls. In the same county, in 1810 he and his family were listed on the census as eight free persons of color. The whole family had changed color. A free person of color at that time meant any person that was not white no matter what nationality they were. Why did the Males' racial classification suddenly change?


    Oral tradition tells us that Wilmore II married a woman named Priscilla Harris. Her father was supposed to have been Cherokee, and her mother was a servant on the Calm's plantation in Maryland. The mother's nationality was not known. This oral tradition is supported by its publication in the April 16, 1936 edition of the Mountain Democrat. The article was entitled Garrett County History of Pioneer Families by Charles Hoye. Wilmore's other son James was supposed to have married the daughter of an Indian scout of Cherokee descent. This is written in the Males of Barbour County, West Virginia by Bernard Victor Mayhle. These marriages account for the sudden change in the racial classification of the Male family. In 1899, a Smithsonian anthropologist by the name of James Mooney sent out a questionnaire to physicians in communities in Maryland, Delaware and North Carolina concerning various topics having to do with Indians and Indian remains. These results are still in the archives of the Bureau of American Ethnology in Washington, D.C. The findings show that there were three or four families going by the name of Male or Mail in the extreme western part of Maryland near Oakland and Deer Park who had traditionally migrated from Hampshire County, Virginia, a few generations before William Gilbert says in his article, "Mixed Bloods of the Upper Monongahela Valley, West Virginia," "It is likely, that from these much smaller pockets of Indians remnants the recruits were drawn together sometime during the nineteenth century to form the nucleus of the larger present day settlement of Guineas in Barbour and Taylor Counties, West Virginia." This was written in 1956. This is the most common name [Male--ed.] found in our people.


    I saac Kennedy or Cannady was born in Maryland in 1760. He married Mary Runner. Isaac is the father of the Kennedy line of the Guineas. His son was born in Hampshire County, Virginia in 1800. His wife was Elizabeth Male. We share the two variations of this name with the Chickahomini of Virginia and the Melungeons. The Kennedys or Cannadys migrated with the Males to Barbour and Taylor counties.


    Joanne has already told the oral tradition of Sam Norris and Pretty Hair. They were already in the Barbour County area when the Males and Kennedys arrived. Records show that the Cherokees were traveling through that part of western Virginia during the time that Sam's father was captured by William Norris. The Horn Papers by W. T. Horn, show that William Penn transferred the Delaware to the territory, bounding the western branches of the middle reaches of Monongahela River in 1696. This included Green County, Pennsylvania, parts of Washington and Fayette Counties, and nearby territory in what is now West Virginia. This would now be in Monongalia County, in the vicinity of Morgantown. The puzzle is starting to fit together.



    Gustavis Croston, the father of the Croston line in Barbour and Taylor Counties, was born in 1757 in Hampshire County. He along with Wilmore Male, Sr., and Henry Dorton or Dalton, served in the Revolutionary War. It was said that Croston was a spy. We don't know whom he married. Some of the Crostons were called Leather Heads and others were known as Black Dutch. If anyone knows what these two terms mean, I would appreciate the information. Two of his children married Male's and migrated to Barbour and Taylor Counties.


    Henry Dorton or Dalton is the father of the Dalton line in Monongalia, Barbour and Taylor Counties. He was born in Prince George County, Maryland to Ann Dorton or Dalton. She was an indentured servant of Jane Martin, an Innkeeper. In 1777 he was drafted into the Revolutionary Army. On June 4, 1781, he married Eleanor Russel, in Prince George County, Maryland. In 1790, he migrated to what is now Monongalia County, West Virginia. Some of his children married into the Males and Hills. As years passed, the family spread into Barbour and Taylor counties, also. On a personal note, I am acquainted with some of the Daltons and find that most of them still have a very striking Indian resemblance. Service records that some of the Daltons entered the service under the racial classification of Indian.


    One line of Adams came into Monongalia County in 1840 from Pennsylvania. His name was John and he married Nancy Pritchard, the daughter of Warner Pritchard and Sophia Goins. Their children first married the Males and Daltons. Another line came out of Tucker County, West Virginia. We don't know much about them. We share this name with the Mattaponi Indians of Virginia.


    One line of the Newmans came from Loudon County, Virginia, and married into the Crostons early on. We also found marriages between them and the Piscataways of Maryland.



    The Minards also came from Pennsylvania and may have had French Canadian connections. Records show that some Minards went with Lewis and Clark on their expedition west. They married into the Sioux and came back with the group.


    The last two names of our people are the Parsons and the Collins. These are the ones we know the least about. We do find these two names listed on the 1784 Hampshire County census, along with the Males and Newmans but we don't know if these are our Parsons and Collinses. We do share the name Collins with the Mattaponi and Pamunkey of Virginia, the Melungeons and the Creoles of Alabama.


    Other families that married into our people early on were the Johnsons, Hills, Cooks, Burkes, Russels, Stevens, Proctors, Thompsons, Barnetts, and DeCosta's. Are these some of your family names? Is there a connection between these names and your groups? These are some of the questions we hope will be answered by the research of the Melungeon Heritage Committee.


    I want to mention one thing about the DeCosta's. This is the only family name that married into our people which may be of Portuguese descent.


    I want to add that after the removal of the Indian Tribes to the west, only two major classifications were used on the census in the Eastern U.S. These were white and colored. In which category were non-reservation Indians usually listed? The colored. As time went on, colored began to mean black. Just in the last few years this racial classification has begun to change for us, since we have started to place ourselves in the American Indian category on census records and documents.


    In closing, I would like to mention two or three books that would give you further reading about our people. The first is The Males of Barbour County, WV by Bernard Victor Mayhle. This book is done in five editions and it is the genealogy of the Males and related families. Books on the Adamses, Hills, Barnetts, and more are written by Glenn Barnett II . . . Last is the book Our Kind of People, Identity, Community and Religion on Chestnut Ridge by Thomas McElwain, copyright 1981. The writer was a student from the University of Stockholm, Sweden, He tells of our struggle to fight the racial category we were placed in, the discrimination we continue to endure, but most of all our determination to regain our Indian recognition.





  8. #8
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    Does anyone have a current GOOD e-mail eddress for the Catawba's enrollment committee, Historian/Genealogist? I have tried to contact the Tribal information e-mail and it comes back NOT a good eddress. I am interested in the Brown's and others in my family.

    saj: do you know of any connection for our family to the Catawbas?

    Thanks, Bob

  9. #9
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    You have to be descended from one of the people on the 1943 roll.

    It just so happens that only 15 percent of the descendants of the 1760 Catawba that had a treaty with the USA to get 15 miles of land are even included in that 1943 roll.

    Chief Donald Rodgers has told me he is aware of the missing people but does not know why it was done like that.
    P: Newman, Teal, Petty, Jeffries/Jeffers, Dobbins,Collins,Little,Johnson,O'neal and Bryant, Lee,Jones, Gray, Echols,Cave, Moore, Flemming and Jordan, Brown,Brock,Bass, Payne

    M: Yarbrough,Taylor and Cherry,Drake,Turner,Jacobs,woods

    And of course I married into the Richardson Family.

  10. #10
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    Baby Brown
    Early Brown
    Donald Brown
    Edith Brown
    Edna Brown
    Edward Brown
    Emma Brown
    George Brown
    Gracie Alice Brown
    Harold Thatcher Brown
    Leola Brown
    Lizzie Brown
    Mary Ann Brown
    Nettie Brown
    Ottis Roddey Brown
    Peggy Thatcher Brown
    Rachel Brown
    Richard Brown
    Roy Brown
    William Brown

    Thats the browns listed on the 1943 Catawba roll. Made July 1st 1943.
    P: Newman, Teal, Petty, Jeffries/Jeffers, Dobbins,Collins,Little,Johnson,O'neal and Bryant, Lee,Jones, Gray, Echols,Cave, Moore, Flemming and Jordan, Brown,Brock,Bass, Payne

    M: Yarbrough,Taylor and Cherry,Drake,Turner,Jacobs,woods

    And of course I married into the Richardson Family.

  11. #11
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    Chief Donald Rodgers
    donaldr@comporium.net

    That one does work.

    If you get a reply or not...thats another story....lol
    P: Newman, Teal, Petty, Jeffries/Jeffers, Dobbins,Collins,Little,Johnson,O'neal and Bryant, Lee,Jones, Gray, Echols,Cave, Moore, Flemming and Jordan, Brown,Brock,Bass, Payne

    M: Yarbrough,Taylor and Cherry,Drake,Turner,Jacobs,woods

    And of course I married into the Richardson Family.

  12. #12
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    Catawba (probably from Choctaw katápe, `divided,' `separated,' `a division.'-Gatschet).
    The most important of the eastern Siouan tribes. It is said that Lynche creek, South Carolina east of the Catawba territory, was anciently known as Kadapau; and from the fact that Lawson applies this name to a small band met by him southeast of the main body, which he calls Esaw, it is possible that it was originally given to this people by some tribe living in eastern South Carolina, from whom the first colonists obtained it.
    The Cherokee, having no b in their language, changed the name to Atakwa, .plural Anitakwa. The Shawnee and other tribes of the Ohio valley made the word Cuttawa. From the earliest period the Catawba have also been known as Esaw, or Issa (Catawba iswä', `river'), from their residence on the principal stream of the region, Iswa being their only name for the Catawba and Wateree rivers. They were frequently included by the Iroquois under the general term Totiri, or Toderichroone, another form of which is Tutelo, applied to all the southern Siouan tribes collectively. They were classed by Gallatin (1836) as a distinct stock, and were so regarded until Gatschet visited them in 1881 and obtained a large vocabulary showing numerous Siouan correspondences. Further investigations by Hale, Gatschet, Mooney, and Dorsey proved that several other tribes of the same region were also of Siouan stock, while the linguistic forms and traditional evidence all point to this eastern region as the original home of the Siouan tribes. The alleged tradition which brings the Catawba from the north, as refugees from the French and their Indian allies about the year 1660, does not agree in any of its main points with the known facts of history, and, if genuine at all, refers rather to some local incident than to a tribal movement. It is well known that the Catawba were in a chronic state of warfare with the northern tribes, whose raiding parties they sometimes followed, even across the Ohio.

    D. A. Harris
    The first notice of the Catawba seems to be that of Vandera in 1579, who calls them Issa in his narrative of Pardo's expedition. Nearly a century later, in 1670, they are mentioned as Ushery by Lederer, who claims to have visited them, but this is doubtful.
    Lawson, who passed through their territory in 1701, speaks of them as a " powerful nation" and states that their villages were very thick. He calls the two divisions, which were living a short distance apart, by different names, one the Kadapau and the other the Esaw, unaware of the fact that the two were synonymies. From all accounts they were
    formerly the most populous and most important tribe in the Carolinas, excepting the Cherokee.
    Virginia traders were already among them at the time of Lawson's visit. Adair, 75 years later, says that one of the ancient cleared fields of the tribe extended 7 miles, besides which they had several smaller village sites. In 1728 they still had 6 villages, all on Catawba river, within a stretch of 20 miles, the most northern being named Nauvasa. Their principal village was formerly on the west side of the river, in what is now York County, S. C., opposite the month of Sugar creek. The known history of the tribe till about 1760 is chiefly a record of petty warfare between themselves and the Iroquois and other northern tribes, throughout which the colonial government tried to induce the Indians to stop killing one another and go to killing the French. With the single exception of their alliance with the hostile Yamasi, in 1715, they were uniformly friendly toward the English, and afterward kept peace with the United States, but were constantly at war with the Iroquois, Shawnee, Delawares, and other tribes of the Ohio valley, as well as with the Cherokee. The Iroquois and the Lake tribes made long journeys into South Carolina, and the Catawba retaliated by sending small scalping parties into Ohio and Pennsylvania. Their losses from ceaseless attacks of their enemies reduced their numbers steadily, while disease and debauchery introduced by the whites, especially several epidemics of smallpox, accelerated their destruction, so that before the close of the 18th century the great nation was reduced to a pitiful remnant. They sent a large force to help the colonists in the Tuscarora war of 1711-13, and also aided in expeditions against the French and their Indian allies at Ft Du Quesne and elsewhere during the French and Indian war. Later it was proposed to use them and the Cherokee against the Lake tribes under Pontiac in 1763. They assisted the Americans also during the Revolution in the defense of South Carolina against the British, as well as in Williamson's expedition against the Cherokee.
    In 1738 smallpox raged in South Carolina and worked great destruction, not only among the whites, but also among the Catawba and smaller tribes. In 1759 it appeared again, and this time destroyed nearly half the tribe. At a conference at Albany, attended by delegates from the Six Nations and the Catawba, under the auspices of the colonial governments, a treaty of peace was made between these two tribes. This peace was probably final as regards the Iroquois, but the western tribes continued their warfare against the Catawba, who were now so reduced that they could make little effectual resistance. In 1762 a small party of Shawnee killed the noted chief of the tribe, King Haiglar, near his own village. From this time the Catawba ceased to be of importance except in conjunction with the whites.
    In 1763 they had confirmed to them a reservation, assigned a few years before, of 15 miles square, on both sides of Catawba river, within the present York and Lancaster Counties., S. C. On the approach of the British troops in 1780 the Catawba withdrew temporarily into Virginia, but returned after the battle of Guilford Court House, and established

    Benjamin P. Harris
    themselves in 2 villages on the reservation, known respectively as Newton, the principal village, and Turkey Head, on opposite sides of Catawba River.
    In 1826 nearly the whole of their reservation was leased to whites for a few thousand dollars, on which the few survivors chiefly depended. About 1841 they sold to the state all but a single square mile, on which they now reside. About the same time a number of the Catawba, dissatisfied with their condition among the whites, removed to the eastern Cherokee in western North Carolina, but finding their position among their old enemies equally unpleasant, all but one or two soon went back again. An old woman, the last survivor of this emigration, died among the Cherokee in 1889. A few other Cherokee are now intermarried with that tribe. At a later period some Catawba removed to the Choctaw Nation in Indian Territory and settled near Scullyville, but are said to be now extinct. About 1884 several became converts of Mormon missionaries in South Carolina and went with them to Salt Lake City, Utah.
    The Catawba were sedentary agriculturists, and seem to have differed but little in general customs from their neighbors. Their men were respected, brave, and honest, but lacking in energy. They were good hunters, while their women were noted makers of pottery and baskets, arts which they still preserve. They seem to have practiced the custom of head-flattening to a limited extent, as did several of the neighboring tribes. By reason of their dominant position they gradually absorbed the broken tribes of South Carolina, to the number, according to Adair, of perhaps 20.
    In the early settlement of South Carolina, about 1682, they were estimated at 1,500 warriors, or about 4,600souls; in 1728 at 400 warriors, or about, 400 persons. In 1738 they suffered from smallpox; and in 1743, after incorporating several small tribes, numbered less than 400 warriors. In 1759 they again suffered from smallpox, and in 1761 had some 300 warriors, or about 1,000 people. The number was reduced in 1775 to 400 souls; in 1780 it was 490; and in 1784 only 250 were reported. The number given in 1822 is 450, and Mills gives the population in 1826 as only 110.
    In 1881 Gatschet found 85 on the reservation, which, including 35 employed on neighboring farms, made a total of 120. The present number is given as 60, but as this apparently refers only to those attached to the reservation, the total may be about 100. See Lawson, History of Carolina, 1714 and 1860; Gatschet, Creek Migration Legend, 1-11, 1884-88; Mooney (1) Siouan Tribes of the East, Bull. 22, B. A. E., 1894, (2) in 19th Rep. B. A. E., 1900; H. Lewis Scaife, History and Condition of the Catawba Indians, 1896. The books presented are for their historical value only and are not the opinions of the Webmasters of the site.

    Handbook of American Indians, 1906
    P: Newman, Teal, Petty, Jeffries/Jeffers, Dobbins,Collins,Little,Johnson,O'neal and Bryant, Lee,Jones, Gray, Echols,Cave, Moore, Flemming and Jordan, Brown,Brock,Bass, Payne

    M: Yarbrough,Taylor and Cherry,Drake,Turner,Jacobs,woods

    And of course I married into the Richardson Family.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ga-Nc Collins
    You have to be descended from one of the people on the 1943 roll.

    It just so happens that only 15 percent of the descendants of the 1760 Catawba that had a treaty with the USA to get 15 miles of land are even included in that 1943 roll.

    Chief Donald Rodgers has told me he is aware of the missing people but does not know why it was done like that.
    Well that leaves my family out, my ancestors were west by 1850's. I have no family east after the late 1860's.

  14. #14
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    Your in the same boat as me........my direct blood line families had all moved into Chief Mcintosh's area of GA between the 1820-1850 time frame.
    P: Newman, Teal, Petty, Jeffries/Jeffers, Dobbins,Collins,Little,Johnson,O'neal and Bryant, Lee,Jones, Gray, Echols,Cave, Moore, Flemming and Jordan, Brown,Brock,Bass, Payne

    M: Yarbrough,Taylor and Cherry,Drake,Turner,Jacobs,woods

    And of course I married into the Richardson Family.

  15. #15
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    My question about the Catawba concerns the Scott family. I have read that the Scott family was a rather large portion of the Catawba for some time and then they just vanished or moved off some where. I wonder where they went?
    I recently have been discovering that my maternal Scott family line may have come from Ashe County, N.C. and perhaps Lenoir County, N.C. in the 1810 to 1820s range. Solomon Scott was born about 1792 in N.C. but the birth date could be off and I'm thinking 1812, most probably either Ashe or Lenoir Counties, N.C. but I'm still researching them out. They are in Chambers County, AL area in the 1860s and before that the Columbus, GA area starting about 1830. John Thomas Scott and his wife Katherin Mary Thompson. They married in 1866 in Columbus GA.
    Evil is an outer manifestation of an inner struggle.

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