Blackfoot Indians

This topic contains 166 replies, has 95,861 voices, and was last updated by  itconani 17 years, 10 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 167 total)
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  • #28226

    Michelle Small
    Participant

    Thank you very much…. my grandfather died and some if not all our history was lost before I knew I was part Indian. I want to KNOW HOW I and my family could past the hertiage of the Haliwa people to the up coming generation. I will ask Jade for more information about my grandady and great granddaddy. Thank you for your information.

    Michelle Small

    Caudle decendant

    Linda wrote: I’m not sure if this is the policy, but I’ve heard buzz that you could be the chief’s grandson, but if you moved away, you wouldn’t be Haliwa anymore. I hope that was just gossip and it’s not true, but I’ve heard enough of it that it may be a good idea to steele yourself for something all those lines. Good luck.

    Look up Jade, (Buffalowoman) here on the forum. She’s got Haliwa roots too.

    #28365

    Matsane
    Participant

    I just finished reading all the posts on this forum. Now I have more of a mystery than I did before. As I told in my story when I first joined, we were always told we were part Blackfoot. Growing up in the southwest, we assumed this referred to the Montana Blackfeet tribe. When I started researching my family history I quickly figured out that none of my ancestors lived where the Blackfeet lived. All but one of the Indian lines in my family originated in the southeast – in Virginia, Kentucky and the Carolinas.

    All of my grandparents were born in Kansas. Their families came to Kansas from Illinois, Indiana or Ohio. My great-grandfather, George Milligan, is the one who passed down the story of our Blackfoot blood. Now I’m wondering if he actually knew the specific tribe or not. I know his mother claimed to be 1/4 Indian but she died when George was 16. Did he remember her story correctly? George’s brother, Ezra, was good friends with Buffalo Bill and for most of my life we thought we were related to Bill. We remember it being Sioux who were part of Bill’s show but after reading some of these posts I’m wondering if there were, indeed, some Blackfeet in Bill’s shows as well. I can’t help but wonder if this might have some bearing on the identification of the specific tribe. Then again, since the majority of the members of Bill’s shows were Sioux, would it not make more sense for Sioux to be the tribe instead of Blackfoot – if this is where the tribal identification originated?

    All I know for sure is that we are not Montana Blackfeet. My ancestors, Thomas Ellis and Judah Wright, were born in the Carolinas, migrated to Indiana, then Illinois. Their descendants ended up in Kansas. Did they pick up the Blackfoot designation in the midwest or did it come with them from the southeast? Sure wish I knew. :confused:

    I grew up in the southeastern corner of Colorado and now live in northwestern New Mexico. The Navajo, Ute and Apache people live in this area. While the names of their tribes are well known, you do not find people claiming to be from those tribes unless they really are. The Blackfeet were a tribe that people feared, to take on their designation without being one seems quite strange to me. Especially during a time when a lot of people were trying to hide their Indian blood in general, let alone the blood of a tribe like the Blackfeet. Personally, I have often wondered if Blackfoot might have been a slang term for Indian in general, or perhaps as has been mentioned, a slang term for people of mixed blood.

    One last thing, in public my friends and I usually refer to ourselves as American Indian but in private we call ourselves Indian or NDN. Most people around here use their specific tribal designations. Some of the government signs use the word Indian. If pressed to choose, I would say about half the people prefer Native American and the other half prefer American Indian or Indian. Like most things, it probably depends on the day you ask. 🙂

    Matsane

    #28366

    Michelle Small
    Participant

    I was reading the last post and thought that this quote was the best in referencing your statement. The migration of siouan Indians and mixture of various cultures does not illiminate the fact of YOUR OR MY Indian heritage. As I search further into my indian hertiage, I find my mother was more than 1/2 Saponi Indian and 1/4 Lakota. We need to understand the migration of the Souian Indian to include those mixing with other cultures without illimating the fact of our “Indianness”. The quadroon law was made to divide our people not bring them together. So what they were from Carolina/VA they all derived from the same suspected tribe located within the montana region.The migration of Indians from the west I suspect could have adpoted the present culture in the order of social survival. Please some reference LINDA(or correction..I am a humble correctable Indian):p

    Linda wrote: The “regular’ Blackfoot are Algonquin. They speak an entirely different language and have a different culture. Also, the Algonquin were often enemies at various points of various Siouan groups.

    But there IS a Blackfoot group we may be related to, the Sihisapa of the Teton Sioux. ‘Sihisapa’ means “blackfoot” in Lakota. ‘Issi asepa hiye’ means ‘blackened foot’ in Tutelo (Saponi). The town of Saxapahaw, NC is a corruption of this word. It may just be a reference to people who did a lot of farming, since slash and burn techniques were used to clear fields prior to planting.

    #28380

    roca
    Participant

    Dear Michelle,

    (Message #108) What is the “quadroon law”?

    Roca

    #28390

    Michelle Small
    Participant

    This was apart of the Jim Crow Laws established and implemented in southern states to determine race and now I believe “underwritten” standard rule of thumb in determining (mixed) racial identity. I was simply indicating that some of these rules which were very stupid were made to divide our people in 1/4, 1/16,1/8th categories which are not really necessary in order of significance of Indianess. We are Indians which have mixed cultures whether they are black white, Spanish, Asian or whatever culture. It has caused the divide of true Indianness in that individual and has them questioning the authenticity or genuineness if they could be or not be true Indians. I was simply commenting on the last person who did not correlate the Blackfoot nation in Montana with the Virginia/NC Blackfoot which somehow demoted them as being Indians by being a mixture of Black ancestry it was not a big stretch people migrated and mixed into other cultures.:o MIXED INDIANS ARE STILL INDIANS!! Here is some information on that crazy quadroon law which was made to divide our people….:mad:

    The one-drop rule is a historical colloquial term in the United States that holds that a person with any trace of sub-Saharan ancestry (however small or invisible) cannot be considered white[1] and so unless said person has an alternative non-white ancestry they can claim, such as Native American, Asian, Arab, Australian aboriginal, they must be considered black.

    to read about that aweful JIM CROW law :((http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One-drop_rule)

    ..

    roca wrote: Dear Michelle,

    (Message #108) What is the “quadroon law”?

    Roca

    #28396

    techteach
    Moderator

    Michelle:

    I don’t think that that person was denying their Indian heritage. They were commenting that the Blackfoot we talk about here on this forum is not part of the western Blackfoot (although there has been discussion on this forum about a rumored migration of eastern Siouan to the west as outlined in McGa’s book).

    The comment was also that that person lives in a area where it is wise not to share your Indian heritage to tribal members until you get to know them. I work with the Lakota and have only mentioned my mixed heritage to one of my Lakota friends after I got to know him. At that point, he knew I was not interested in tribal money nor was I trying to emulate his religion. He accepted me and said that he was glad I was working there to learn of my heritage. He did not call me a wannabe, as other tribal members will do.

    I concur with your opinion on who is Indian.

    Techteach

    #28400

    Wachinika
    Participant

    Welcome to Matthew, Matsane and Michelle 🙂 .

    Originally posted by Matsane

    I have often wondered if Blackfoot might have been a slang term for Indian in general, or perhaps as has been mentioned, a slang term for people of mixed blood.

    I can’t see this would happen. My family appears to be a mix of only Indian and Euro-Americans. There’d be no bringing black into it for mixed blood ID. As a child growing up in the 50’s, whites in Indiana referred to black people as Negro…never Black. Only after the 60’s when the popular Black culture let it be known they wanted to be referred to as Black did that become the term applied to those of African-American descent. As I understand from posts by people living in the southeast, the term Blackfoot has been around the non-mixed Indian communities for along time. To just pick Blackfoot out of the hat seems far out to me. Many other tribes were better known in popular culture. It was related to me in a manner of all seriousness, not in anyway in the context of joking or cleverness. I could see it becomming used because of the peoples mixing with Blacks. But when so many people have self identified as Blackfoot, I wouldn’t call it slang. I think of it as older with a meaning lost with the language and parts of the culture.

    #28401

    Michelle Small
    Participant

    Thank you for clearing that up:) but I would like to hear from him if you do not mind. He did not clearly state that but it was implied by myself that based on the former comment he was stating on the ancestry of the Suioan people within that region may be questionable based on black ancestry”Blackfeet” and of course “the migration”of our people . I will read more about this within that book you had mention. I am not familar with Lakota people and I am sorry if I offended anyone. BECAUSE OF THE MURDER OF MY GRANDAD WHO WAS INDIAN and I did not know my mother was 75% Indian.(She was not Lakota it was Muharian.) All she was accustomed to do is adhere to society’s standard of mixed black people placing her in one catorgory of Black. I was stating that society has placed these rubics of measurement deciding who is totally INDIAN OR NOT I was just stating that….. But thank you for your insightness and knowledge of the LAKOTA people I will KEEP YOUR Comments in mind.:p

    MICHELLE

    techteach wrote: Michelle:

    I don’t think that that person was denying their Indian heritage. They were commenting that the Blackfoot we talk about here on this forum is not part of the western Blackfoot (although there has been discussion on this forum about a rumored migration of eastern Siouan to the west as outlined in McGa’s book).

    The comment was also that that person lives in a area where it is wise not to share your Indian heritage to tribal members until you get to know them. I work with the Lakota and have only mentioned my mixed heritage to one of my Lakota friends after I got to know him. At that point, he knew I was not interested in tribal money nor was I trying to emulate his religion. He accepted me and said that he was glad I was working there to learn of my heritage. He did not call me a wannabe, as other tribal members will do.

    I concur with your opinion on who is Indian.

    Techteach

    #28403

    Wachinika
    Participant

    Hey techteach,

    Can you give us a little more information on McGa’s book? I can’t get it to come up on Search here and Google gives me Multi-Color Graphic Adapter & Manitoba Conola Growers Association.

    #28405

    techteach
    Moderator

    Sorry, I spelled his name wrong. It is Ed McGaa. The book is “Crazy Horse and Chief Red Cloud.”

    If I am not mistaken, the problem with connecting the Eastern Blackfoot with the Western Blackfoot is that the Western Blackfeet speak an Algonquin language while the Eastern Blackfoot, if indeed they were Saponi, spoke a Siouan language (and I am not set in this position – I was told by a linguist that the languages were structurally similar, so that when different tribes were together, as in Shamokin where there were Iroquois, Siouan, and Algonquin speakers in the same town, they could converse with the help of some demonstration, i.e. holding up the item you were describing).

    McGaa spoke of the Lakota moving west. Of course, they speak a Siouan language.

    Techteach

    #28414

    Tonio
    Participant

    Even full-blooded Natives that where dark enough where labled as Negro. Especially in Virginia! My family is from Orange County, and Louisa County VA,and even though my family was of high Native American blood that one drop of Negro blood was enough to have them be classified as “Negro”.

    #28415

    Linda
    Keymaster

    Has everyone here seen the article linked from the main page, http://www.saponitown.com/Blackfoot.htm ? That sums up a lot of the research we’ve done over the years concerning what I believe are the origins of the eastern Blackfoot ID.

    #28416

    Linda
    Keymaster

    Matsane, all of the points of origin of your family, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, and then through the midwest could possibly be the sources of the Blackfoot ID in your family.

    #28423

    Michelle Small
    Participant

    Thank you Linda I will read that article of research link . I may have missed that I am always willing to learn. :p Michelle Small

    quote=Linda]Has everyone here seen the article linked from the main page, http://www.saponitown.com/Blackfoot.htm ? That sums up a lot of the research we’ve done over the years concerning what I believe are the origins of the eastern Blackfoot ID.

    #28424

    Michelle Small
    Participant

    Very interesting research article.So the pronunceation of the word sissponi cause a misinterpretation and misunderstanding of the actual meaning? I can understand that my grgrandad was a farmer and his dad Solomon Caudle was as well and I was told he had a funny dialect which is common for that area.Thank you I now have a little more clarity about this subject. Thanks!

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