The Kets

This topic contains 8 replies, has 3,144 voices, and was last updated by  Bev Stayart 9 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #3933

    Bev Stayart
    Participant

    The Kets of Russia are believed to be the survivors of an ancient nomadic people originally living in central southern Siberia. There were 1,494 Kets in Russia in 2002, according to census figures. Today, the Kets are no longer nomadic and live in small riverside villages.

    According to the book “The Descent of Men,” by Steve Jones, “Recent Y chromosome DNA evidence shows that the Kets are related to many Native American tribes. The Kets gene is also present in Irish, Basque, and has a particularly high occurrence among Welsh males.”

    #34590

    Three Crows
    Participant

    Bev

    That is a fascinating piece of inforamtion. In reading faces over the years, I have often though that certain native American Faces appear similar to some of the native people of the land we now refer to as Russia. I have always believed that is because they migrated over the land bridge when it existed, long ago.

    The Welsh part is a surprise to me.

    #34593

    Three Crows
    Participant

    Ah geez. It looks like I need to engage my speel checker.

    #34597

    Tahwey
    Participant

    Three Crows, Iffn ya dont lern howta spell, weeuns is gonna hafta brang inna interpuder.

    #34598

    Three Crows
    Participant

    Cain’t hep it Tahwey. It’s just how I was brung up.

    #34705

    Bev Stayart
    Participant

    Steve Jones is a highly acclaimed author and professor of genetics at University College, London. His prior books include “Darwin’s Ghost” and “The Language of Genes.”

    Quoting from his book, “Y The Descent of Men”:

    The Kets are a people of the Yenisei River basin in the Krasnoyarsk province of eastern Russia, in the heart of Asia, three thousand miles from the Bering Strait. Two centuries ago they were abundant; a nineteenth-century traveler described them as plump with thin legs and a staggering walk, flitting eyes, and a jerky way of speech. They looked, he said, rather like Finns. Today a mere thousand or so are left. . . . Their language is on the edge of extinction, with a few hundred speakers and a desperate attempt to keep it alive. It is the last member of a once prosperous group — Yug, Pompokol, Arin, and others — which, even a century ago, was spoken over much of southern Siberia. These languages were quite unlike any other in the region, and their verbs had up to eighteen separate sounds. Ket is a distant member of a vast confederacy of tongues, which includes Chinese, several Caucasian dialects, certain languages of the New World — and perhaps even Basque.

    “Ket”, in Ket, means man; and Ket men, their chromosomes show, have a close tie with the natives of the Americas. The commonest haplotype in the New World — borne by the majority of Native American males — traces straight to the Kets and is absent from the tribes who surround them. The aboriginal Americans hence find at least some of their forefathers in the heart of what was until not long ago the Soviet Union.

    #34737

    Bev Stayart
    Participant

    Steve Jones, in his book “Y The Descent of Men,” notes:

    “The ancestors of the Kets were, male DNA proves, a source not just of the American Indians, but of the first postglacial hunters of Europe and, as a result, of the settlers of the British Isles. Native Americans are linked with the people of Wales through their Y chromosomes, which make a genetic connection between Kennewick Man and Prince Madog — not drawn across the Atlantic, but across twelve thousand miles of Europe, Asia, and Alaska. Madog’s genes are in the New World, but got there via a path quite different from that imagined by legend.”

    The inference is that the ancestors of the Kets migrated both to the West to Europe and to the East across the Bering Strait to the Americas. This explains the genetic link of the Welsh/Irish/Basques with the Native Americans.

    #35054

    Bev Stayart
    Participant

    If there is a genetic link between the Celts (Irish, Welsh, Scots) and the Native Americans, it is evidenced most clearly in their poetic insights. Native Americans and Celts are both noted storytellers and poets.

    Three of my favorite Irish poets are Edgar Alan Poe, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and Arthur O’Shaughnessy. In Arthur O’Shaughnessy’s poem “Ode” from his book “Music and Moonlight” (1874), he speaks of the Celts as the “music makers” and the “dreamers of dreams.” Despite his characterization of his fellow Celts as “world-losers” and “world-forsakers,” he providentially notes:

    Yet we are the movers and shakers

    Of the world for ever, it seems.

    Similarly, Native Americans evidence an uncanny ability to see the world clearly and without artifice. My favorite Native American quotation is from Geronimo in his famous 1886 conversation with General Crook. Geronimo simply asked Crook, “Why don’t you look at me and smile at me? I am the same man.”

    #35055

    Three Crows
    Participant

    Keep going Bev we are listening..

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