Primitive Living Thanks to Mother Nature

Searching for Saponitown Forums Shoot the Breeze Primitive Living Thanks to Mother Nature

This topic contains 16 replies, has 3,413 voices, and was last updated by  Dreaminghawk 4 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #4312

    Dreaminghawk
    Moderator

    North Carolina is currently a mess. 200,000 people without power, hundreds of wrecks, grocery stores and hardware stores bare of all essentials.

    We lost power shortly after storm started last night. Woke up to about a foot of snow this morning. I’m not crying….. at least I don’t live in Boston 😉

    We weathered the storm fine. We normally heat with 2 wall-hung propane heaters so our heat was never a problem. We didn’t need to go anywhere and we normally do primitive camping at powwows so we were prepared. Just been enjoying walking in the winter wonderland and doing a lot of reading. Only without power for 18 hours…. many, many still without.

    I do feel for all those who weren’t as prepared or accepting of what Creator sends our way.

    Our motto for some time now has been “It is what it is.”

    #37068

    seeker
    Participant

    Wow. Riding the storm out ay? We’ve had record amounts of snow here in “Michiana” for this month as well. Its been a testing couple of winters for sure. Im glad you were prepared and are doing ok. Camping would great in better weather….

    I would so much rather be more self sufficient than I currently am, in fact it bothers me greatly to not be more prepared. I sure miss my wood burner, and not being able to get a bigger garden in to put away because of having to move.

    Ive been through some tough ordeals and survived before, and come to realize that you never know what you can survive through.. till you do. I don’t think the testing is over.

    I will pray for provision to those in need…take care.

    #37069

    Dreaminghawk
    Moderator

    One of the funniest things I saw on social media was posted by someone in Alabama. It was a snowplow with the caption “Who knew Alabama had a snowplow.”

    I was raised primitive. We hunted, trapped, fished, gardened and gathered wild food. We would take honey and eggs to the local general store to trade for sugar and coffee but that was about it. We went to town once a year right before school started for school supplies. When I was 8 years old I discovered one of my classmate’s family bought all their food in town and didn’t even have a garden! I had never heard of such a thing.

    The funny thing is that I didn’t realize that we were poor. We were never hungry and Mom made sure we had shoes to wear to church. Some of the other kids didn’t have church shoes. I thought we were rich. LOL

    #37071

    seeker
    Participant

    In my oppinion you were rich. Moneys so less valuable than the knowledge and experience you had growing up. Sounds like a dream to me. I was poor growing up to, but didn’t have the security it sounds like you had. What a blessing. I would love to live that way 🙂

    #37072

    Dreaminghawk
    Moderator

    Let’s see if I figured out this picture thing.

    Attached files

    #37078

    techteach
    Moderator

    Looks like my back yard.

    #37138

    Dreaminghawk
    Moderator

    Yeah, buttercups are blooming, redbuds are budding…….. spring can’t be far behind. 😉

    #37139

    techteach
    Moderator

    It has been really nice this week here. Only what was the highest piles of snow are left. I had capris and sandals on today.

    Techteach

    #37165

    MarcSnelling
    Keymaster

    Happy spring to all y’all! No grass showing here yet. Our backyard igloo is melted down to about 3 feet high, but we are getting a few inches today so can build it back up. 😛 Siberian squill is the first flower to bloom here – before the crocuses – but nowhere close to that y…

    #37166

    Dreaminghawk
    Moderator

    My Mom has over 100 varieties of daffodils. Last spring, as they bloomed, we moved a small clump of each kind into a row closer to her house and also moved a small clump of each kind to our house and gave many away to others.

    2 varieties, both fairly small, old fashioned, solid yellow flowers she calls “chicken house” and “millhouse” have been in our family since the late 1700s…. moving some to each new homeplace for each generation. I have some and my one daughter who has her own house also has some planted. Best I can figure it, my daughter is the 7th generation to enjoy the beauty of these same family flowers.

    Several other varieties have been in the family well over 100 years but those 2 are the only ones with that story.

    #37167

    seeker
    Participant

    I wonder if the solid yellow daffodils are the same that grew in my backyard at the old house?

    Wow sorry MarcS. Comes with the territory I recon for you. It started getting nice enough to go for walks about a week ago here. I haven’t figgured out how to post pictures yet or I would have shared on I got of our worst snow here this winter. We got at least two feet Id guess. Wet snow that piled up on the trees. I just noticed a couple days ago the first flowers are shooting up here. I had spring fever so bad I had to get out and clear my herb garden. Highest temp has been 70 so far. You can bet I was bare feet out in it to. 🙂 Hope your day comes soon.

    #37168

    Dreaminghawk
    Moderator

    I wonder if the solid yellow daffodils are the same that grew in my backyard at the old house?

    It wouldn’t surprise me. They are very basic and hardy. This time of year is when we ride around and locate old home places …. just look for the daffodils abundant where they shouldn’t be. Once you see the flowers you can stop and usually identify other non-indigenus plants like hedges, magnolias, old fruit trees, …. may even be able to find the old foundation…… fan out about a thousand feet and maybe find a fieldstone family cemetery.

    #37170

    seeker
    Participant

    Good chance they were. It is the oldest house in its location built 1920 something. The flowers grew randomely around the back yard. One time I got lucky enough a morel mushroom or two popped up. The house I’m in now is older even and has many old flowers around the yard. Even had a suprise crocus (sp?) Pop up in the middle of the back yard.

    My husband owned this house for about 15 years and said he had never seen that one before. Crazy how they can just be hiding for so long and pop up after years. Reminds me of the years at the country house (the one lived in between the other two) how every year something else becomes the dominant plant. First year it was goldenrod. Then crazy different grasses..then these massive weeds that got taller than humans..always something new. Elderberry abundant, perslain, beautiful wild tomatillo like plants (ground cherries? forgot their name but see their bloom in my head still). Frangrant milkweed and thistle the birds loved. Many “weeds” I never had the heart to pull out of my gardens there. Could have litterally lived off the edible wild plants. About now the red wing blackbirds are singing in the spring there, along with the spring peepers perhaps. Bet my fruit trees are budding. Miss that place.

    Sounds like fun your roaming about old homesteads.

    #37171

    seeker
    Participant

    I spoke to soon. It would snow today. I have to remember its still March in northern Indiana. Blah.

    Guess I better keep dreaming..lol

    #37172

    seeker
    Participant

    Keep calm .. make tea :p In my case, hot mint with honey… yea buddy. Thumbs up.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)

The forum ‘Events’ is closed to new topics and replies.