Senecas of the Sandusky

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  • #28926

    elkriver
    Participant

    cowboy wrote: Elkriver you live in the area my people were do you know of the Sulpher Bend Cemetery outside of Fairland Ok it used to be on the Nesoho River but was moved when they damed it.

    John D. Blalock,

    Fairland, Indian Territory.

    Dear Sir: –

    You heretofore filed with the Commission, certificate from Commission on C

    itizenship, showing the re-admission to Cherokee citizenship on June 30, 1

    888, of Sarah A. Blalock and four children; also Cherokee marriage licen

    se and certificate showing your marriage on May 4, 1893, to Miss Sarah Jones.

    My gggrandmother and father who are cherokee are in there this is my grandmothers side.

    I have Blalock or Blaylock’s that are connected to these people also Daughterys.

    I think I might have heard of that cemetary. Fairland is maybe a 10 min. drive from here. But I would guess that they were probably not Cherokee but most likely Shawnee as Blalock and Daughtery are both common Shawnee names. But as I said they would have been listed as “Cherokee” as the Loyal Shawnees were on the Cherokee rolls, most listed as “Cherokee-Shawnee”. The Shawnee’s prime tribal location is in and near a small town called White Oak, Oklahoma…however most are scattered throughout north eastern Oklahoma with many living in or near Maimi, Oklahoma, there current Tribal Office is located in Miami.

    #28927

    techteach
    Moderator

    Elkriver:

    I have a favor to ask also. Do you know of links for surnames of Shawnee, as you posted the link for Wyandot surnames in another forum? I have seen the list from 1879 (6) or whatever that year was. It has several McLanes listed, one of my surnames. I am interested in simply identifying who they were, so maybe there will be other of my surnames listed as Shawnee. The evidence points to then being this tribe (although I do have Van Meters connecting. They all lived on land in OH that was Wyandot land.)

    Techteach

    #28928

    elkriver
    Participant

    Brenda Ferrell Sampsel wrote: Cayuga Migration & Surname BUCK, Seneca of the Sandusky

    “BEFORE THE INDIAN CLAIMS COMMISSION

    THE

    CAYUGA NATION OF

    INDIANS,

    PETER

    BUCK AND

    STEWART JAMISON

    MEMBERS

    AND

    REPRESENTATIVES THEREOF,

    THE

    SENECA-CAYUGA

    TRIBE;

    OF

    OKLAHOMA,

    Docket No. 343

    P l a i n t i f f s ,

    v.

    THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

    Defendant.

    Decided: July 20, 1972

    .

    “……The Cayuga Nation, a member of the Six Nations, occupied territory

    in New York State i n the vicinity of Cayuga Lake. After the Revolutionary

    War, i n which the Cayugas had fought on the side of the British, the

    tribe splintered, with one group enigrating to Canada, a second group

    moving to Western New York State, and a third group removing to Ohio. …”

    http://digital.library.okstate.edu/i…iccv28p237.pdf

    Notice the surname BUCK and also note the verification of a migration to OHIO. I see no reason why some Tutelo would not have been part of all three of these splinters, rather than merely of the group that immigrated to Canada.

    Brenda

    The Western Band of the Cayuga Indian Nation can trace its antecedents to the Cayugas who left New York for the Sandusky region, primarily during the first three decades of the 19th century. Although these people frequently were labeled “Sandusky Senecas” by federal Indian agents, they were primarily Cayugas, not Senecas. Further, more Cayugas were living at Sandusky than in New York in 1832, at the time of the initial Cayuga removal beyond the Mississippi. Cayugas continued to outnumber Senecas in the “Seneca” villages in the west, until the early 1870’s. Today Western Cayuga comprise a significant portion of the modern Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma. Further, the Seneca-Cayuga continue to follow many of the old traditions and cultural patterns of the historic Cayuga Indian Nation.

    Although designated as part of the “Senecas,” first in Ohio, then in Indian Territory, the Cayugas contunued to maintain a separate political entity within the “Seneca-Cayuga” community and both tribes joined to form the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma, in 1937. Prior to 1937 chiefs of the Western Band negotiated independently with the State of New York, recieved annuity payments from the State, and conducted their own agreements with other bands of the Cayuga Indain Nation, or with other tribes. Since 1937 they have acted as a political entity through the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma, which the federal government has designated as a legal representative of the historic Cayuga Indian Nation. In addition, the federal government also has concluded that the members of the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe are biological and cultural descendants of the historic Cayuga Indian Nation that once resided primarily in New York, and that the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe is a successor to the historic Cayuga Indian Nation that entered into the 1794 Treaty of Canandaigua.

    Anthropologists, and the Seneca-Cayuga themselves are aware that the traditional language apoken in the modern Seneca-Cayuga community is Cayuga, not Seneca. Many of the old Cayuga clans still persist, although some others seem to have faded. The Wolf, Bear, Turtle and Deer clans remain, and they are still devided into moieties according to their position int he Long House. The Seneca-Cayuga still hold many traditional Iroquois ceremonies in their Long House, a structure wich also illustrates the contunued cultural connections between the Seneca-Cayuga and the New York Cayugas. Built for their religious ceremonies, the Seneca-Cayuga Long House differs from those in New York by having open sides that allow for ventilation in the heat of the Oklahoma summers, but they share an east-west orientation. The Strawberry Dance takes place in the late spring, and the Green Corn Ceremony, held in August, remains a highlight of the Seneca-Cayuga summer. People still play the peach seed game and tribal traditions are still passed down through the generations by Faith Keepers, or “Pot-Hangers.” Tribal names contunie to be passed down through the clans and a Cayuga child is not considered to be a full member of the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe until he or she resieves his or her Cayuga name at the Naming Ceremony. Modern Cayugas still travel to New York and Canada, to visit with friends and relatives, and also entertain visitors from these Cayuga settlements in their Oklahoma community. In sum, although some of the old ways may be gone, others continue. The Western Band of the Cayugas, encompassed in the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma, retains a strong connection to the cultural and ceremonial practices of the historic Cayuga Indian Nation.

    #28929

    cowboy
    Participant

    My mother was born in White Oak alot of my people is buried there.

    Listen my people are on all the rolls from the 1817 emigration roll “cherokee” my gggrandmother is on the 1851 Old Settler Roll she is buried in Sulpher Bend Cem.

    They were Jones and Fraizer they married Blalocks

    and Daughterys who were Shawnee.

    #28930

    elkriver
    Participant

    techteach wrote: Elkriver:

    I have a favor to ask also. Do you know of links for surnames of Shawnee, as you posted the link for Wyandot surnames in another forum? I have seen the list from 1879 (6) or whatever that year was. It has several McLanes listed, one of my surnames. I am interested in simply identifying who they were, so maybe there will be other of my surnames listed as Shawnee. The evidence points to then being this tribe (although I do have Van Meters connecting. They all lived on land in OH that was Wyandot land.)

    Techteach

    you might check this out:

    http://shawnee-bluejacket.com/1871_registry.htm

    #28932

    techteach
    Moderator

    Thanks, elkriver. That is the list where I found the McLanes, but I have no idea if they connect or not. My McLane is a mystery. We don’t know the parents. She was the second wife of someone who is credited with starting the school in Slippery Rock, PA. The first wife came west with the Quakers who taught Cornplanter’s people. Her grandson described the tribe around her area of western PA as Cornplanter Seneca. However, I have since read that Cornplanter’s reservation was a haven for many displaced people of many tribes.

    Techteach

    #36480

    MarcSnelling
    Keymaster

    This thread and the posts from TechTeach and Red Hawk line up with a lot of my family history. Like Red Hawk I suspect the Seneca as part of early mixed-tribal villages in the Northwest Territory, subsequently the Indiana Territory. The more old posts I read from TechTeach the more I’m convinced we must be not-so-distant cousins. (Something Linda suggested many years ago when my mother posted here.) It seems like I’m late to the game with all this research having gone on a decade ago. Or perhaps it’s just that I’m the next generation down.

    #36481

    Dreaminghawk
    Moderator

    Hey Marc, you aren’t coming late to the game but you are the next generation of researchers. Most of the original members of Saponitown did our flurry of research and got to our roadblocks and brick walls. Many have since moved on to other more pressing endeavors. Some have gone to join the ancestors. Hopefully now they have all their questions answered.

    There is a world of research here. Thanks to Linda, it is still here for you and other researchers to use. I am sure there were times when Linda was ready to let it go but she didn’t.

    Linda, if this is what is remembered as your life’s work (this and your beautiful children) then it is a life to be proud of. You have literally helped thousands of people discover who they are. There is no other site which has compiled as much info on the tribes and mixed bloods that radiated out of VA/NC as you will find here. May Creator continue to bless you, for you are truly a blessing to our people.

    #36482

    MarcSnelling
    Keymaster

    Good to know DreamingHawk. Things have changed over the last decade. I’ve moved back further or sideways on some previous brickwalls. There is more and more old history being digitized and posted to the Internet all the time.

    I have come across many genealogical researchers with praise for this site. There is so much here. Billahuk to Linda for keeping it alive for us ‘youngsters’. 🙂

    #36490

    techteach
    Moderator

    Well, I am not gone. I am just busy dealing with health problems that if we are related, you hope you don’t inherit. If you do DNA, it is on sale at Ancestry, and you could find out for sure if we are related.

    Didn’t you say you had Potters?

    Techteach

    #36491

    techteach
    Moderator

    Oh, and BTW, there certainly were Senecas in the NW Territory. I know that some of my Greens were regular visitors to the home of the siblings of Joseph Brandt. They were some of those who were the Senecas of the Sandusky.

    The area of my McClanes was the Pittsburgh area. My Ralston was born in Greensburg, PA while his Blackfoot wife was born in Beaver County, PA. They lived in Slippery Rock where there are still many Ralstons who are related to me.

    Techteach

    #36493

    MarcSnelling
    Keymaster

    My DNA and my mothers are on 23andMe. I have a free ancestry.com account but am not sure how to go about that. How would I compare to your DNA? Is it like gedmatch.com?

    We do have some genetic diseases in this side of the family. Myself and one of my daughers are carriers of one particular gene but do not have the disease. I can talk to you about that privately if you are curious.

    Potter was my grandmother’s maiden name and she is the one who passed the Blackfoot name on in my family. That came from her mother, Inez Louise Smith. Her father was Marion Howard Potter. Their pictures are in my profile.

    Marion Potter’s grandfather was Thomas Potter born about 1798 in PA, died 2/3/1872 in Darke Co OH. This is a longstanding brick-wall.

    Thomas’ son Julius J Potter was born 1836/37 in Darke Co, he died at 57 years of age on 3/15/1893 in Delaware Co IN. He was a blacksmith. The family says he passed after being kicked in the head by a horse. He was married twice to Christina Stainbrook (my ancestor) and Rebecca Figle.

    Thomas Potter married Emily Beeler on 12/30/1827 in Butler Co OH. Her mother was a Kyger. There is a fair amount of genealogy on these lines. Another Kyger married a Parrish and we have found out through DNA we are no more than 3rd cousin to some present day Parrish folks.

    The Beelers were Bohler in Germany. Christoff Frederick Bohler was born 1683 in Palltinate Germany. His son Christian was born in Westphalia Germany and came to Lancaster PA on the ship Samuel in August 1732. Info from an 1893 letter says he was wealthy, brought his servants with him and that the family were decended from English aristocracy further back. His son Samuel Washington Beeler was born in VA 1743 he married a Hurst. Their son James Beeler was born 1783 in Hampshire CO WV. They moved to Kentucky sometime after that. They movded to Butler Co OH in 1808 and he married Elizabeth Kyger there on 7/21/1808.

    Samuel Washington Beeler had a daughter-in-law named Elizabeth Collins whom he mentioned in his will dated 7/13/1824 in Butler Co OH. He also had a son-in-law Joel Collins. Eleazor Hoag and Francis Rockhold witnessed the will.

    The Kygers were among the earliest settlers of Butler Co OH. The Kyger and Beeler family are associated with the Teagarden family of Westmoreland Co PA. I have other ancestors early to that area of PA.

    #36494

    techteach
    Moderator

    MarcSnelling;37154 wrote: My DNA and my mothers are on 23andMe. I have a free ancestry.com account but am not sure how to go about that. How would I compare to your DNA? Is it like gedmatch.com?

    We do have some genetic diseases in this side of the family. Myself and one of my daughers are carriers of one particular gene but do not have the disease. I can talk to you about that privately if you are curious.

    Potter was my grandmother’s maiden name and she is the one who passed the Blackfoot name on in my family. That came from her mother, Inez Louise Smith. Her father was Marion Howard Potter. Their pictures are in my profile.

    Marion Potter’s grandfather was Thomas Potter born about 1798 in PA, died 2/3/1872 in Darke Co OH. This is a longstanding brick-wall.

    Thomas’ son Julius J Potter was born 1836/37 in Darke Co, he died at 57 years of age on 3/15/1893 in Delaware Co IN. He was a blacksmith. The family says he passed after being kicked in the head by a horse. He was married twice to Christina Stainbrook (my ancestor) and Rebecca Figle.

    Thomas Potter married Emily Beeler on 12/30/1827 in Butler Co OH. Her mother was a Kyger. There is a fair amount of genealogy on these lines. Another Kyger married a Parrish and we have found out through DNA we are no more than 3rd cousin to some present day Parrish folks.

    The Beelers were Bohler in Germany. Christoff Frederick Bohler was born 1683 in Palltinate Germany. His son Christian was born in Westphalia Germany and came to Lancaster PA on the ship Samuel in August 1732. Info from an 1893 letter says he was wealthy, brought his servants with him and that the family were decended from English aristocracy further back. His son Samuel Washington Beeler was born in VA 1743 he married a Hurst. Their son James Beeler was born 1783 in Hampshire CO WV. They moved to Kentucky sometime after that. They movded to Butler Co OH in 1808 and he married Elizabeth Kyger there on 7/21/1808.

    Samuel Washington Beeler had a daughter-in-law named Elizabeth Collins whom he mentioned in his will dated 7/13/1824 in Butler Co OH. He also had a son-in-law Joel Collins. Eleazor Hoag and Francis Rockhold witnessed the will.

    The Kygers were among the earliest settlers of Butler Co OH. The Kyger and Beeler family are associated with the Teagarden family of Westmoreland Co PA. I have other ancestors early to that area of PA.

    I don’t recognize any of your names other than Potter. My Potter allegedly came from England as a criminal. He settled in Maryland. From Maryland, he ended up on Licking County, OH. From there, to eastern Iowa. One of your earlier posts contained names that are mine or linked to me: McCartney and Cooley. My direct ancestor was Mary McCartney who marries William Sinkey and lived in Huntingdon County. From there, they go to Licking County and then Iowa. In Licking County, there are Cooleys living among the the Potters and Sinkeys in OH and move with them to Iowa.

    DNA from different companies can be compared on Gedmatch if you upload, however, they are changing their servers, so they won’t be taking new tests for a while.

    Techteach

    #36495

    MarcSnelling
    Keymaster

    I got my DNA into GedMatch before the server crash. My kit number is M223631. My results just came in and I’m still learning to navigate that site.

    The Cooley in my line is the second husband of Christina Stainbrook, so these are half-relations to me. Her first husband was Julius Potter, her second husband Robert C Cooley. Robert Cooley was born 7 May 1846 in Delaware Co IN. They were married on 18 Sep 1893 in Muncie IN. They had two children Nancy Pearl Cooley on 1 Jun 1894 and John C W Cooley on 6 Oct 1897 both in Blackford IN.

    I haven’t looked at these Cooley’s much. Seems that Benjamin Cooley b 25 Feb 1615 in Hertfordshire England was the first in the US. He married Sarah ? in 1642 in Hampden MA.

    William Seth Cooley Sr was Robert’s father born 4 May 1800 in Westchester NY, died 17 Sep 1874 in Delaware Co IN.

    My grandmother’s aunt Cora M Potter married Jasper Newton McCartney on 25 Jan 1890 in Delaware CO IN. Jasper’s second wife was named Mary born 1869 in OH.

    The first McCartney in this line was Thomas McCartney who came from Ireland in 1775 at 6 months old. He died Mar 17 1863 in Lewis Co, WV.

    Not seeing anyone named Sinkey or a match to those locations.

    #36496

    MarcSnelling
    Keymaster

    BTW This is not the line that pointed me to the Seneca.

    That is through my grandfather’s line. His name was Drybread and there is good info on them as they started geneaology in the 1800s.

    George Drybread was the son of Frederick Druckenbrod and an unknown wife. He was born 7/14/1753 in what is now Westmoreland Co PA. The Drybreads were either Quakers or assoicated with them. They were out by the Alleghany forty years before the Quakers established the Seneca school with Corn Plant.

    Frederick Druckenbrod came from Germany. The family were known for skills in breeding animals and raising crops. The family story is a battle between brothers led to the name change. One changed his name from Druckenbrod to Drybread. There are not many with this name. Yet there were at least four men named Seneca. My mother wanted to name me Seneca but chose a more common name.

    George Drybread married Susannah Sager and settled on a farm in PA. Their first daughter Mary was born Feb 4 1777. They had four children in PA then moved to the Kentucky Territory in 1785 after four new counties were created. They had six more children there. In 1798 they moved to the Northwest Territory. William Drybread was born in ‘The Gore’ what is now Dearborn Co IN in 1799. The last two of their thirteen were born in Butler Co OH

    This line has four plus generations regularly travelling back to the lakes in Seneca country.

    There is a McColley line on this side that brick-walls with Catherine McColley born about 1738 in Harrison Co WV.

    Don’t see any connections on this side though.

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