Trail of Tears

This topic contains 84 replies, has 12,149 voices, and was last updated by  Tom 15 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 85 total)
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  • #9484

    Tom
    Participant

    More on CORN………

    The web site http://www.southernexposure.com has some good references to “gourdseed corn”.. a type that originated in southern Va.

    Linda this maybe the solution to your corn problem… perhaps with Tutelo beans and a squah if I find it may be of help..

    These postings are adding up and I think that each item may need a seperate thread.All the Best,

    Tom

    ps a huge gourd variety all nice products here, I do not know how far from where you are but this place is in VA.

    #9492

    Linda
    Keymaster

    I found their catalog page for gourds, but couldn’t find any refefrences to any originating in southern Virginia. Do you remember what page it was on?

    #9493

    Tom
    Participant

    Hello, It was in reference to the gourd seed corn that mentions Va origins. You may want to call them and ask if they can help you out.

    For a purley Va gourd or atleast Va and Nc I’d look for an old time gardener family perhaps someone familir with the Hill folks can help, maybe amongst some of the Catawba, etc.

    Iam not sure exactly what to say, since gourds are rather obscure it may be hard to find a pure source.

    If I can locate one I’d would definetly post it.

    What did you think of the “gourd seed corn”? I have also seen a bean with corn shaped seeds, I beleive that the color may have been blue.

    Tom

    #9501

    Tom
    Participant

    Hey Linda just a thought, , if you ask the folks at Abotech.com or post a query on gardenweb.com furums , they have a section just for gourds , maybe either could help.

    Also the Qualla folks may know something, other that the folks in your area Iam not sure what to suggest., search ?

    hope all is well, Tom

    #9503

    Linda
    Keymaster

    I talked to a man today who has a friend who used one of those big gourds to make a water drum. I think he was talking about the bushel gourds (they can grow as big a bushel). I was trying to understand the technique, it’s hard to explain, especially when you only half understand it, but I thought that was very intriguing. I tried making a water drum out of one of my large birdhouse gourds, but I couldn’t get the skin tight enough to make any noise.

    #9504

    Tom
    Participant

    Hey Linda well Iam not sure what to say, I did read about a gourd recently that was a very thick type, Iam not convinced that all gourd drums were large, I think that many forms may have existed.

    Also look at water drums from around the south for a different type of binding as there are several. Aswell the method of binding will be different from a Northern plains style drum, but you could research it and come up with your own , do what works best.

    There is a northern method of binding that only has a cross of strings on the bottom not like what is done on other drums, if I can locate a pic I’ll send in own down.

    Aswell a northern drum is ” conditioned before use.

    Hope this helps. !

    #9505

    Tom
    Participant

    ditto

    #9506

    Linda
    Keymaster

    Harry Hurley grows the giant bushel gourds and he says NC is the best place in the world for gourds. From what I’ve heard, you shouldn’t grow more than one variety in a locale, since they will cross pollinate and you will get mutts with unpredictable characteristics. There’s just forest at Fort Christanna now, did you mean something may be growing wild there now? I think I do remember seeing a lady holding a gourds in one of those White paintings. I need to look at those again. We’ll likely get some sprouting on their own in our garden this year. Some grew last year, too late in the season to get thick enough. We just left them out there and they fell apart during the winter.

    I’ve still got some large birdhouse gourds out in the garage from the first season they grew here. I should try playing with the approach that man described.

    #9507

    Tom
    Participant

    Well that would be nice if you could find a variety of wild gourd to use and I have heard of them but very small and round.

    The woman that is carrying a gourd in Whites? drawings is holding it by the top it looks as tho’ there is a handle cut into it.

    Ill try and post a notice to a main source of seed growers. It is a book of heirloom variety seed growers etc, their may be something there.

    If would contact your USDA and ask for a Native rep. to help there must be one in NC.

    Also ask at any of the museums if they know, US agriculture is very well organized so they must have something.

    Best wishes Tom

    #9508

    Linda
    Keymaster

    There’s an ethnobotanist floating around here I’ve heard about. I’ll have to remember who it is who knows this person. He will likely know the answer, or know how to find out.

    #9510

    Tom
    Participant

    Also, there is Barrie Kavasch from cn I think she may know something, she is probably on the web, an ethnobotonist and great person to visit with.

    #9511

    Tom
    Participant

    Linda have you heard of the “Bean Woman story”?

    I have seen several references to it, amongst the books that come up, The book is called Native American gardening” and has a very interesting Tutelo story and looks like a nice resource book to have. By Gary Paul Nabhan, 1996

    #9514

    Linda
    Keymaster

    Here it is:

    One sample activity gives the participants the opportunity to learn about seeds from Native North American crops. A Tutelo story, called The Bean Woman, introduces the chapter containing this activity. The story describes a bean woman searching for a husband who can feed her what she likes to eat. After rejecting several animals, the bean woman chooses to marry corn. The story says that this is why gardens planted in the old Tutelo way are seen with bean plants twined around corn plants in a loving embrace. Families plan a Three Sisters Garden and seeds are chosen. The addresses are provided for suppliers of heirloom seeds. Readers can find diagrams for different garden planting patterns. Black and white photographs and line drawings are found throughout the book. A glossary and pronunciation key to Native American terms is included. (Author/JR)

    http://www.enc.org/resources/records/full/0,1240,016318,00.shtm

    #9516

    techteach
    Moderator

    This image sounds like something that might work on the pin that we discussed earlier.

    Cindy

    #9517

    Linda
    Keymaster

    What image is that?

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 85 total)

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