Trail of Tears

This topic contains 84 replies, has 12,149 voices, and was last updated by  Tom 15 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 85 total)
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  • #14292

    lynellarainhawk
    Participant

    Tom,

    🙂 Thank you so much for having pulled this back up! I had no idea this was even here. How totally cool! I love gardening, so does Kerry. He is a much better green thumb than I am. I haven’t done much of it up here, between the uncertain weather and the Elk, Deer, Rabbits and everyone, I get frustrated. But this makes me want to convince Glenn that we need a good big green house. And that would give me something to do when he’s practicing to be a Jedi on the computer! Man, this is really fascinating. I’m all excited now! You just made my day, Tom! Thank you! Love & Light, Lynella.

    #16896

    Tom
    Participant

    It’s early fall again, we’ve had some snow and well winter is on the way, has anyone harvested thier crops?

    Linda how did your beans do!

    #22378

    Tom
    Participant

    Well I thought that I’d refresh this link.

    So far I have had moderate luck with the garden, I have planted a some Anazasi squash and various beans, everthing is in bloom, surprizing tho’ that the native beans are out growing the store bought hybrids., atleast those that are growing!

    #22387

    Mousini78
    Participant

    Well, we have had a lot of regular corn…and I have instructed my mom and Ken to leave the “nubbins” of corn on the stalk to dry so that I can use them for necklaces and for our rabbit.

    I froze some regular squash for the soup this winter. My mom has planted some “Jade” beans…so we will see how they do. Supposed to be kinda like a green bean, but, usually grown in the mountains of Virginia.

    #22388

    dovelady
    Participant

    Hi Tom, thanks for sharing about the garden. I’m excited to hear how the beans do.

    Please do keep us posted, especially at harvest time so we know how things went.

    #22592

    Tom
    Participant

    So far so good, when I first did this reseacrh several years ago I wasn’t sure what to expect, I can tell you that when “they ” said drought resistant they didn’t say these plants also thrive in harsh conditions!

    i have several types of beans growing, 2 types of corn , water melons and Anasazi squash, so far I’am learning more each day!

    I hope to cross the corns and deveolp a mid sized blue corn that is really servicable, blue corn has a complete protien aswell.

    More later.

    #22596

    dovelady
    Participant

    Hi Tom,

    Thanks for the progress report. How exciting that you are growing such rare vegetables and having good success.

    I hope you jot down your observations in a journal of sorts so you can keep them to refer back to when you plant next year’s crop.

    🙂

    #26519

    Tom
    Participant

    Well it’s spring time again and up here we are now planting again.

    has anyone here at Saponi town planted this year!

    WE often here about issues of health a a good diet , this is one way to know what is on your table by growing it yourself.

    #26527

    BlondeyeLaurie
    Participant

    *Raises hand* I have in my smallish yard along the back line a raised strawberry bed…June and Everbearings mixed and they already have oodles of blooms! My children ALL love them and so I grow my own to allow for an organic experience (being as strawberries have SOOO many nooks and crannies for chemicals etc to “hide” within if not grown organically). Anywho….wish I had more yard to try my hand at other plantings…maybe I will try a pot garden that layers up to a hanging basket…I hear tell they are fun and rewarding to grow with minimal effort. I am fortunate to have some local farms nearby that sell organic produce too. Blessings~~~Laurie

    #26533

    Tom
    Participant

    * Looks up and smiles*

    Hello Laurie, well growing strawberries in a hanging basket is really worth the effort, did you know that the Cherokee people claim to be the first people to introduce Euro’s to strawberries?

    If you want that type where they do well suspended then have a look around your nearest garden center, since there is a strain devoted to that!

    Aswell strawberries are grreat medicine leaves, roots etc, they often keep you from lowering your hand too far! smile!

    #26534

    Tom
    Participant

    system burp’s

    #26536

    BlondeyeLaurie
    Participant

    I was recalling where I read about these planter gardens…and if memory serves me correctly…they were made up of a large hanging basket with cherry tom’s planted and then they used twine to string downward to a large floor/ground planter box…growing down the vines were pole beans…and in the base of the planter they had various herbs…and all told, when all of them seasoned for picking you could use them all to make a right nice soup or base for a stew…I’m inspired now…think I’ll try it after all! *trots off to the garage in search of gear*~~~Laurie

    #26541

    Patty
    Participant

    I planted a few tomato plants this year. It’s a far cry from the family garden I shared before I moved, but it’s the first planting I’ve done in 4 summers now.

    #26542

    Mousini78
    Participant

    Well, Dreaminghawk and I decided to do away with most of the grass in our yard by planting various vegetables, herbs, and flowers. On the far side of the yard, we have planted iris, blackberry vines, periwinkle, lamb’s ear, foxglove, and a sunflower planting bed.

    Around our circle we have planted ornamental corn, runner beans, and three types of squash (butternut, yellow crookneck, and zucchini) together. We have 30 hills there. Behind that we have planted tomatoes, grape vine, chamomile, safflower, and wildflowers. We have planted gourds to run up the fence at the edge of the yard, in addition to the peonies, snapdragons, and lillies growing there.

    Near the house and surrounding the deck are more tomatoes, trumpet vine, sage, rosemary, thyme, chives, basil, lavender, wormwood, marigolds, petunias, carrots, radishes, black beans, cowpeas, sunflowers. Most of these are in containers that can be moved in the house in the winter time.

    These are in addition to the garden that my mom has planted out back…approx. an acre there. Tomatoes, peppers, squash, cucumbers, corn, green beans, potatoes, green peas, radishes, spinach, beets, onions, and okra. Our rabbit has enjoyed the fresh greens from the radish tops…and loves the beets. I have enjoyed walking out in the yard and seeing the little seeds pop through the ground and taking off on their own….maybe we will have something to share at get together time???? Most of our plantings came from Ken’s mother’s garden…which makes it very special to us.

    Becky

    #26551

    spilleddi
    Moderator

    Dang Becky, I love your garden.

    I planted shrubs, flowers, grasses, and seeds on sunday, then on monday it hailed and then snowed! Probably why native people here didn’t plant gardens.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 85 total)

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