Trail of Tears

This topic contains 84 replies, has 12,149 voices, and was last updated by  Tom 15 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 85 total)
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  • #26552

    techteach
    Moderator

    We planted shrubs only this year. We started with a large garden that got smaller every year until it was just tomato plants. Not even those this year. But the 17 year cicadas are coming out, so our shrubs may become their garden. They were due yesterday. Some came out, but I have not seen any yet.

    Techteach

    #26553

    sammarroq
    Participant

    I will be planting my herbs today; I have been on the afternoon shift and the kids wanted to help plant, so I waited for my day off. I also picked up a couple strawberry plants for the kids:) . We need more rain here, it has been so dry.

    #26554

    Ed Yancey
    Participant

    Becky and All, I know “Thou shalt not Covet” ! You folk that can garden in the ground and just talking about it makes my mouth water ! Living here in an apartment is very comfortable for Rachel and I and you have kindly listened to our prattle about the frogs and the wetlands around us so my gardening is on the patio and porch. Tomatos in containers for summer and collards in same containers for the winter. This year I planted 3 tomato varieties and the largest marigold variety I could find. The old time ones we just saved from year to year and I used to grow them as my height with blooms as big as saucers. All of this planting was by seed earlier this spring and I have a 4th variety of tomatos just coming up in little cups. I found a variety of tomato that is supposed to be heirloom called Cherokee Purple that I hope to try next year. I also planted a dwaf fig tree which is in a large container and a dwaf banana tree also in container. At present I am trying to root an heirloom rose bush my Grandmother brought when she came to live with us. She always had this bush in her yard. It sends out long canes with clusters of tiny roses ( 8-12 per cluster) in the color of purple/lavender. It took me years to root from it and now the one she brought to our home is gone but I hope I can root these last cuttings. I have a Passion Vine also growing and then a hosta plant my other Grandmother and her sisters always had. They called it August Lily and had neve heard of hosta , only in last two years have I seen it offered in catalogue as “Royal Standard” hosta. Makes an excellent large pot plant that rewards you with long stems with circles of white lily blooms around August. The blooms are very sweet and fragrant. They die back in cold weather and come back in the spring. Just know this old country boy fussed day in and day out when we had to hoe and chop the gardens and crops. I would complain how bad my back hurt and my father’s only reply was “when I was your age I didn’t have a back.” Now I love growing things as much as anything else. By the way, how many of you had a Mother so cold and caloused that when you had hurt yourself and she was pouring Iodine on the cut and you are thinking she is going to kill you her only statement of sympathy was ” It will get well before you get married.” I often wonder, it is amazing the wisdom and insight they had raising us children and never had the first psychology book or Dr. Spock ? We can only hope we have done half as well with our children. I have to share this piece of wisdom on a bill board in front of one of the gas stations here in Morehead. ” If your parents didn’t have children chances are you won’t either” Now if that doesn’t grab you—-just remember I didn’t make that statement ! Ya’ll have a Great and Wonderful day. ED

    #26555

    Mousini78
    Participant

    Tanya…you do seem to have the strangest weather out there…my daughter in WY can attest to that as well.

    Strawberries here won’t last but about another two weeks. I hope one day to plant some in our little garden, just for fresh consumption mainly.

    Ed..Ken was waiting for your response about container gardening…LOL. I do have quite a few in containers that I can move about. It was Ken’s urging that got things going in the yard (I hate grass!). I was thinking yesterday about starting an old fashioned rose bush on the corner of our drive…there’s plenty of room for it to bush out over the fencing. And that is one plant that we see in a lot of old homeplaces and cemeteries.

    The tomato plants we have were gifts from Ken’s mama, so we didn’t really pick them out ourselves. I would like to order some heirloom seed and try them…I have a website in my favs for that.

    Ed, I well remember griping about the work in the garden (I think it was just last week). Seems like my mama worked us to death in the garden and mowing grass (maybe that’s why I hate grass). I can’t say I like working in the garden, but, I like eating the fresh food. Of course my mom does it the hard way, in the sun and heat, and has too much planted to do it in a timely basis. I prefer our yard with the small plantings and the variety.

    And yes, I well remember, not iodine, but mercurochrome. It burned and then Mama would blow on it…and tell me it would get better before I got married. But, I am thankful that she made me work hard, I have a better appreciation of the value of things now. And I am glad I made my kids work in the garden as well. They know where their food comes from and what it takes to produce it. I pity the children that don’t know their hamburger came from a cow or even what some vegetables are. I run across that in the grocery store when I buy artichokes or asparagus…the cashiers will ask what it is.

    #26558

    Tom
    Participant

    Now there’s some folks that know how to garden, the ‘coveting” well I am sinner, no kidding I live in a small place with very little area to grow anything, but even the patio sounds so cool!

    I have been growing (last year) Cherokee black valentine beans, trust me they are the best almost as good as candy, almost!

    The great thing about growing beans is that they don’t cross, they are polinated before they are opened, and they do well in a pot too.

    The only real meat that I can add here is that when I watered, I used to use a compost tea, really well rotted buffalo manure, but it didn’t take much, what ever you use, put a small amount into a large bucket and fill with water, like a pint of “roughage” to 5 gallons and then use that to water the garden.

    Ed those rose’s sound so special, Mom was always partial to those small yellow tea rose’s!

    I had squash with walls of meat 3-4 inches thick and they lasted the winter, I think that it was beacuse of the “compost tea”..

    Gardens- What a great blessing to have !

    #26559

    Tom
    Participant

    Has anyone searched for native american crop seed sources?

    #26562

    Ed Yancey
    Participant

    Tom, I never heard of the Cherokee beans before,where did you get the seed? We had neighbors (Bowlings) originally from Person County who lived into their 90’s. They had all these old seed that are probably not around anymore. One was a stringbean they called “cut short” and they were that but hanging full on the bushes about 2 1/2 -3 inches long. When you strung them you pulled a string each way but when they hit that hot water in the pot you could smell them all over the house. They had another corn field snap bean that also was short with purple stripes and again had to be strung but when they hit the hot water they turned a brilliant green and again what amarvelous aroma and taste. Most folks don’t realize that when they bread to the stringless varieties of snap beans they lost flavor. They planted a pea called Red Ripple that had Red pods about 10-12 inches long and shelled out peas about the size of full grown pinto beans. When you cooked them the turned the color of pinto beans and had a wonderful flavor but I have searched for them and not been able to find them either. The best butterbeans I think I ever grew came from seed grown with a row of Calico or Colored beans in the middle of two rows of Thouragreen butter beans. Of course the beans were true to their variety the first year but I saved the dried beans from the middle row of calico and planted them the next year. They had inherited some of the small green butter bean flavor but had the pods with number of beans coresponding with the calico variety and also cooked up dark like the calico. Corn will cross pollinate and mix the first season grown but the beans will only show the difference the second season.

    That Cherokee Purple Tomato was advertised in a spring catalogue I had as an heirloom variety produced before 1890. They did not offer seeds but sold them like 3 plants for $4.98. I might try them next year. If they are an heirloom variety you ought to be able to save the seed from them. ED

    #26563

    sammarroq
    Participant

    Tom,

    While looking for the symbol on the drum I posted, I came across these links…a lot of good information.

    http://www.kstrom.net/isk/food/plants.html

    http://www.kidsgardening.com/growingideas/PROJECTS/MARCH02/mar02-pg3.htm

    here are some more…

    http://www.sherrysgreenhouse.com/pages/seedstarting/sources/seeds-1.html

    http://www.nativeseeds.org/v2/cat.php?catID=65&PHPSESSID=3fcfab6b72ec3d021032f3b6f95d06e9

    http://thegreenguide.com/doc/120/ancestral

    Tom,

    On another note…while shopping for herbs…I was drawn to the selection of Lupine…how I miss the fields that are common in Montana. Is Lupine also common in Alberta?

    Shirley

    #26569

    Tom
    Participant

    Hey Ed if you send me a private message I’ll and if you’d like me to send you some seed then include an address where I might send them to, an office is fine.

    I really miss those big gardens that were so much fun, although personally I have only grown smaller versions. I used to visit with “old timers” and they’s share a heap a good stuff.

    I have some really good sources for seed and will share with those that are interested.

    Sammarroq, thanx for the great links, there are lupins heres, I know what you mean about missing them, I used to spend time in the Rockies, you know that old song “spring time in the Rockies” well it’s spring time again and I’ll get out to take some pic’s and post here.

    We have a wild flower that looks just like a true black snap dragon, no kidding a real black flower, I was shocked to see it!

    Sam” have you thought to grow some of those lupins?

    #26575

    Mousini78
    Participant

    Tom, if you miss the old big gardens…come on down our way about mid-July…we should have a bumper crop of corn for you to help shuck. And plenty of tomatoes to peel and freeze…well, that’s after you eat your fill of “dripping off the elbows” German Johnson tomatoes (sandwiches). Not to mention the cucumbers that we will be making into pickles. My mom was raised during the depression and she still plants like she has all her younguns’ to feed.

    Ed, we have planted what was called runner beans on the package…kinda like the type you are describing, but a green bean. My mom planted a flat bean last year that was really good….it was a crop her Virginia friends raised…she didn’t plant them again because she prefers Blue Lakes.

    Oh, I take the old coffee grounds and let them dry out a bit and then sprinkle them onto the plants. I use tea grounds as well. Not to mention the eggshells go onto the irises and flowers, too. We have been saving the rabbit manure to use in compost. I figure it will need to “mature”, won’t it?

    Becky

    #26576

    Tom
    Participant

    Hey Becky thanx for the invite, you just never know, about the bunny stuff I am not sure could be.

    The coffe grounds are a great idea, last year I tried every chemical to get rid of flea beetles and nothing worked, than I asked on old time gardener and he said coffee grounds, so at the fast food joint gas station ( with the $5 a gallon gas) they saved the grounds for a couple hrs for me enough to cover my garden and “wa luh” not beetles!

    #26588

    Greywolf
    Participant

    Thanks Tom for the info on the buffalo manure tea. I have Cheroke beans left over from two years ago. The buffalo calves are being born right now, have had several already. I won’t offer to ship any buffalo chips so please, nobody ask.

    #26589

    Wachinika
    Participant

    Greywolf, that’s great!

    How many head of buffalo do you have? (May I ask how you utilize them?)

    #26590

    Wachinika
    Participant

    Becky,

    I’ve read that you can use rabbit droppings right away without letting them mellow. I had put some in my house plants…was better there than where the rabbit put them.

    #26591

    sammarroq
    Participant

    Tom wrote: Hey Ed if you send me a private message I’ll and if you’d like me to send you some seed then include an address where I might send them to, an office is fine.

    I really miss those big gardens that were so much fun, although personally I have only grown smaller versions. I used to visit with “old timers” and they’s share a heap a good stuff.

    I have some really good sources for seed and will share with those that are interested.

    Sammarroq, thanx for the great links, there are lupins heres, I know what you mean about missing them, I used to spend time in the Rockies, you know that old song “spring time in the Rockies” well it’s spring time again and I’ll get out to take some pic’s and post here.

    We have a wild flower that looks just like a true black snap dragon, no kidding a real black flower, I was shocked to see it!

    Sam” have you thought to grow some of those lupins?

    Hey Tom,

    I do know the song and there is not much that can compare with Springtime in the Rockies. I am sure it is just awesome there right now and it would be great if you could post some photos; I just love that part of the country.

    As for the lupine, I live in town and all my garden space is taken up with herbs. However, if I ever move out in the country, I will have oodles of it as well as other wildflowers.:)

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 85 total)

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