What's Offensive?

This topic contains 120 replies, has 20,126 voices, and was last updated by  1_optimistic 13 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 121 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #18706

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    Originally posted by lewis

    Hi Lynne its Lewis. If everybody celebrated Thanksgiving the way you, your husband, and kids do, i would celebrate it too.

    🙂 Sincerely Lewis Liddell Jr.

    Thanks Lewis.

    I think we should just all spread the word and change the damn holiday….I’m not really kidding about this either.

    We don’t have to make it the “english” who are doing the thanking…..its about time there was at least ONE holiday that made a stab at acknowledging the important contributions of Indians to this country…..and since there is probably a snowball’s chance in hell of actually getting something brand new passed….I whimsically suggest that we just sidle over and co opt this holiday. Why not?

    Cheers,

    Lynne

    #18707

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    Originally posted by quest for facts

    Hi Lynne,

    Long time since we head from you. You know if everyone celebrated Thanksgiving the way you all do there would hardly be anyone to cook since just about everyone is mixed.We wouldn’t get anything in my house.

    Linda

    Hello Linda!

    I have been wanting to post on the forum for quite some time. In my profession, Xmas is all consuming, and Xmas begins before thanksgiving ( which we all know is the day that the English Thank the Indians)…and extends into January…which means that I work for the Post Office.

    Also I have had my R arthritis come out of remission….but I am beating it back little by little. I beat it when I was 18, and I’ll beat it again. Then I had some more skin cancer…which in my line of work is pretty much an occupational hazard……then my husband’s son came over from England around thanksgiving….and of course you know what we did! We had him cook dinner to thank the Indians. Since they had never heard of thanksgiving…..and we laughed so much when he was cooking, he finally had to beg us to tell him what it really meant, and further said that when he returned to England, if he told him one thing, and it really meant another, HE’D be laughed at.

    We said that it really was to thank the Indians, though some misguided people thought it was to thank god. We told him ” if someone kept you alive, gave you food, told you what to eat, gave you food resources that would live and grow in this new place…who you going to thank?” He is now in England telling everyone that Thanksgiving is the day the English thank the Indians….so plan A to subvert Thanksgiving is already underway on an international level. You’ll be glad to know this, I am sure.

    I have spent a lot of time reading up on the Indians of the southeast. Perhaps I can post some of the stuff I’ve read if its not too boring.

    Good talking to you, Linda. Its been too long.

    Regards,

    Lynne

    #18708

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    Originally posted by lewis

    Hi Lynne its Lewis. I agree with everything you just said about Native Americans, intermarriage , racial identity, and race relations.

    Sincerely Lewis Liddell Jr.:)

    Hi Lewis. Thanks for your words.

    I don’t want to bore anyone, but factually, and scientifically, there is no such thing as race. Its an idea without any biological foundation…I could bore you to tears explaining this, but any web search would probably do a better job. Knowing that there is no such thing as race….its time for everyone who uses the term to think really hard about what they are talking about, why they might need the term, and what purpose it serves.

    Just more of my two cents.

    Regards,

    Lynne

    #18709

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    Originally posted by Deirdre

    Thank you for your post Lynn. Thank you. When these words come from our hearts it touches others, as you have touched me; and

    I think our ancestors can smile.

    Deirdre

    Thank you for your warm reply. It heartens me.

    Yours,

    Lynne

    #18713

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    [QUOTE]Originally posted by lewis

    [B]Hi Lynne its Lewis, as i said, i do oberve the National Day of Mourning, which is am alternative event, held the same day.

    Native Americans, in Massachusetts, and New England , have been doing this since 1970.

    Im not a new England Native American, all of my Native American tribal roots are in the deep South.

    My father is of Choctaw Heritage and Im not sure what tribe my Mother is but her Native American ancsetors, were from Columbia Louisiana.

    Having said all that. im observing the National Day of Mourning in solidarity , with the Wampanoag and other New England tribes.

    I dont want to upset anybody, bu this how i feel.

    And i should be honest about how i feel.

    But as isaid i respect the right of others, to observe the day how they want.

    Lynne you are a kind good lady, i hope im still on your good side.

    Sincerely

    Lewis Liddell Jr.

    Thanks Lewis. I am honored.

    A national day of mourning is OK with me. Another Indian saying, is “Live, and let others live”

    It is with a light heart that I would like to subvert Thanksgiving.

    One day, I sat down and really took in just how horrible it was to be an Indian about 300 years ago round these parts. Great grandfathers shot in the back while hunting….all of the bad things, all that was lost…I found that I just couldn’t live that way. I had no more laugh lines in my face, only worried ones. Then I understood why my father never talked about being an Indian to anyone outside of the family, unless he was speaking to another Indian. It was almost like a secret. It was like a secret because there is so much baggage that can’t be explained. Even if someone were interested enough to ask a million good questions of you, you could never answer them all, and in the end, the answers wouldn’t mean very much to them. So I really do understand your point about the day of mourning. Its a lot bigger than Pilgrims.

    Pardon the length of this, but I often think of this situation in the words of Yeats:

    Lapis Lazuli, by Yeats

    I have heard that hysterical women say

    They are sick of the palette and fiddle-bow.

    Of poets that are always gay,

    For everybody knows or else should know

    That if nothing drastic is done

    Aeroplane and Zeppelin will come out.

    Pitch like King Billy bomb-balls in

    Until the town lie beaten flat.

    All perform their tragic play,

    There struts Hamlet, there is Lear,

    That’s Ophelia, that Cordelia;

    Yet they, should the last scene be there,

    The great stage curtain about to drop,

    If worthy their prominent part in the play,

    Do not break up their lines to weep.

    They know that Hamlet and Lear are gay;

    Gaiety transfiguring all that dread.

    All men have aimed at, found and lost;

    Black out; Heaven blazing into the head:

    Tragedy wrought to its uttermost.

    Though Hamlet rambles and Lear rages,

    And all the drop-scenes drop at once

    Upon a hundred thousand stages,

    It cannot grow by an inch or an ounce.

    On their own feet they came, or On shipboard,’

    Camel-back; horse-back, ass-back, mule-back,

    Old civilisations put to the sword.

    Then they and their wisdom went to rack:

    No handiwork of Callimachus,

    Who handled marble as if it were bronze,

    Made draperies that seemed to rise

    When sea-wind swept the corner, stands;

    His long lamp-chimney shaped like the stem

    Of a slender palm, stood but a day;

    All things fall and are built again,

    And those that build them again are gay.

    Two Chinamen, behind them a third,

    Are carved in lapis lazuli,

    Over them flies a long-legged bird,

    A symbol of longevity;

    The third, doubtless a serving-man,

    Carries a musical instmment.

    Every discoloration of the stone,

    Every accidental crack or dent,

    Seems a water-course or an avalanche,

    Or lofty slope where it still snows

    Though doubtless plum or cherry-branch

    Sweetens the little half-way house

    Those Chinamen climb towards, and I

    Delight to imagine them seated there;

    There, on the mountain and the sky,

    On all the tragic scene they stare.

    One asks for mournful melodies;

    Accomplished fingers begin to play.

    Their eyes mid many wrinkles, their eyes,

    Their ancient, glittering eyes, are gay.

    If we can live, and know what we know, and still be “gay”. Then we’ve won.

    Cheers,

    Lynne

    #18715

    Deirdre
    Participant

    You know, I studied history in college and was awarded a degree in it and I learned then that there is no scientific basis for the term “race”. Then it perplexed me that I’d be asked what race I belonged to. I always relpied, “the same one as you do”, but I was received as a smart alec. I was even called a racists once, and I decided that it was impossible for anyone who did not create the divisions among men to truly be what is caclled a racist. Then I thought about it more and determined that we have been viewed as backwards, ignorant, and primitive because we have basic geographic and “cultural” differences from Europeans which, unless you are of the mind to receive something different from your own and unles you open yourself to learn, you wind up manipulating, controlling, and ultimately abusing others in some way. Even today, I find myself sending a slient message to my white sisters to slow down; in your movements, in your sleech. What’s the hurry? Every moment that the Great Spirit allows us to be here should be valued. How can it be valued if we rush through it?

    No Lynne, you are not boring me. YOu are spreading the truth.

    Warmest Regards,

    Deirdre

    #18723

    1_optimistic
    Participant

    I feel the same about (Christ)mas. Today, people who do not even believe in Christ Jesus are participating in (Christ)mas….maybe it is a status thing or something……..retailers are loving it:(

    Erica

    Now to me that’s offensive.

    #18725

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    Originally posted by lewis

    Hi Lynne its Lewis. Im glad to know, im still on your good side.

    It looks like your Native American Ancestors passed down , the very best, Native American values to you.

    Hello Lewis,

    There were some gems in the chaff, to mix metaphores. I think that “live and let live” can’t be claimed by any one people….but the kernel of the idea was most stressed by my Dad. He stressed it whenever he saw someone who was not doing it, and then renforced it as a concept in order to direct us to do it. He felt that way about the landscape too. He was not one to tear down things in order to plant other things that weren’t originally there. He stressed that when he saw other people doing that as well. It applied to everything….and when you apply it to everything, then I think you can claim it as a uniquely Native American way of thinking. Racoons, possums, rabbits and deer would always be problematical when it came to gardens, but he always said that they had to have their bit of it. If it was protected from predation, not all of it was protected. The birds and animals had to have their share of what was grown. He left a fine cherry tree just for the birds. He said: “I can always buy cherries, but they can’t”

    Lewis:

    I did nt’ know Live and let live was a Native American expression, but im not entirely surprised either.

    Me:

    Like I said….I think it can be claimed IF you take it all the way, and apply it to everything.

    Lewis:

    Lynne although, im from Jackson MS originally, i lived in Greensboro NC from ages 16-19.

    Me:

    Gee, Greensboro has grown a lot. I try to avoid it myself, because the streets are a mess.

    Lewis:

    So i know a little bit about the Occaneechi-Saponi, of Orange and Alamace Counties NC.

    Me:

    You know Lewis, I don’t know anything about them either. Mr. Holt, who I belive is the medicine man, used to talk to my daughter when she went to Alamance Jr college. He did a healing on her boyfriend, and called her sister. He called out to her and said he knew she was Indian because of the way she stood and watched, and he said that Indians do that. I had to laugh ( with glee of course) because he’s right. We do it without even thinking of it. My Dad told me once that Silence is a sign of respect. Mr Holt asked her about her geneology, and she couldn’t answer him. Then I felt ashamed. Under ideal circumstances, if such a person, who deserves high respect, asks you that kind of question, you SHOULD be able to place yourself by lineage….she just knew a few names to throw out, but she needed the trace. I have failed in my duty to give her the trace. I am trying to do just that, but….getting the trace on my father’s mother is not easy……and just tracing his father’s side of the family has produced results which are a little shocking to her…being as the folks in Halifax county seem to have been marrying their own relatives for a long time. But I’m trying to find the time to work on it.

    Lewis:

    Is that the branch of Saponi you descend from?

    Or is it, the Haliwa-Saponi?

    Me:

    It has to be the Haliwa. My father always said that. He was from Aurilian Springs, Halifax county. His mother was a Smith, and in her line are Green, Bass, Hux, Pitts…though I don’t have the line of who begat who and when. Just a jumble of names from a first cousin that I can no longer get in contact with. On his father’s side, there is Shaw and Bobbit, that I have found listed as Mulatto, but then again, they are marrying their cousins, and going off to live with them at different times, and it must have been grand for them, but its a mess to trace. My Dad was placed in an orphanage in Raleigh, under sad and contentious circumstances…and though he described himself as a Haliwa, his bitterness kept him from pursuing the issue. No one went to his mother’s funeral, and I found out last month the year in which she died, 1969…..no one bothered to tell me. You could say that he had crossed two knives when it came to her.

    Lewis:

    Sappony tribe of Person County , or some other Saponi?

    Idont’ know for sure, what tribe my Mother’s side of the family were, but i seriously doubt there Saponi.

    However i ha ve a cousin, who’s blackfoot on her father’s side, she’s probably Saponi.

    Maybe you are like me, A Native American from another tribe just visting Saponitown.

    Although im welcolme here, i try not to post much, because im not Saponi.

    Me:

    Well gee, Lewis…seems to me that there is enough topic to cover many issues without getting into who begat who, …you know?

    Anyway Lynn could to hear from you.

    Me:

    Always good to talk to you.

    Regards,

    Lynne

    Sincerely Lewis Liddell Jr.:) 🙂 🙂

    #18726

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Deirdre

    [B]You know, I studied history in college and was awarded a degree in it and I learned then that there is no scientific basis for the term “race”. Then it perplexed me that I’d be asked what race I belonged to. I always relpied, “the same one as you do”, but I was received as a smart alec. I was even called a racists once, and I decided that it was impossible for anyone who did not create the divisions among men to truly be what is caclled a racist.

    Hello Deirdre,

    I see what you mean. People use the term race as shorthand for a variety of things…things that they haven’t really thought about with any clarity. It must really yank the rug out from under them when they find out that there is no such thing as a race. I had an internet discussion once with some stranger, who admitted that there was no scientific or biological basis for race, but STILL wanted some kind of short hand to “describe” what he though of as major differences in appearance….I patiently bored him to tears with statistics and new findings…( gleaned from Science News…my birthday present)….and in the end, had to ask him…if you are marking out a “race” based 98% on the appearance of the face and head, what are you really doing? Just semanitcally the whole idea falls apart, logically it falls apart….but it seems to be a pernicious idea…which says to me that its a stand in for the unspoken.

    Deirdre:

    Then I thought about it more and determined that we have been viewed as backwards, ignorant, and primitive because we have basic geographic and “cultural” differences from Europeans which, unless you are of the mind to receive something different from your own and unles you open yourself to learn, you wind up manipulating, controlling, and ultimately abusing others in some way.

    Me:

    Sadly, this wraps up much of modern society in a nut shell.

    Deirdre:

    Even today, I find myself sending a slient message to my white sisters to slow down; in your movements, in your sleech. What’s the hurry? Every moment that the Great Spirit allows us to be here should be valued. How can it be valued if we rush through it?

    Me:

    I like your ideas. I think that a lot of the rushing has to do with being bound, time wise, to the people we work for..as in “time is money”, and “not on MY time, buddy”…it creeps into your soul…you seem to know what time it is even without a clock….its a modern problem, and I think you are right to be helpful in letting others be mindful of what they are doing and how much they are losing. Just one more way we can, perhaps, reclaim some of the good things about native ways that are not only good for us, but good for everybody.

    Deirdre:

    No Lynne, you are not boring me. YOu are spreading the truth.

    Warmest Regards,

    Good talking to you, Deirdre

    Cheers,

    Lynne

    #19118

    Spirit
    Participant

    This is a very strong topic for a long time even now I get somewhat offended when people concieve me as black. I used to complain all the time when I filled out forms that there was no reference to other that you could mark for race they would have black, white, hispanic, even non-hispanic but that was it.

    I have always referred to myself as tri-racial black white and indian no specific order though. I am what I am it just sad that I know nothing about the white part of my history. But I find it hard being accepted on either side. Funny Huh? I mean blacks look at me as white because of my long hair and grain of hair light complexion, but I think it is mostly out of jealousy though. Then whites assume I am black becausde I am not white enough, no blonde hair and blue eyes, this is my perception so I say where is the love?

    But as long as I know, that is all that matters but I see the racism in very settle ways all the time. It is so unfortunate though. Well honestly I feel most accepted as Indian so that is what I prefer to use not ignoring the other parts at all. But we as “Indians” know the hardships we have and continue to go through, so I guess there is a mutual understanding and this is where I feel most welcome. 🙂

    #19145

    Linda
    Keymaster

    Yes, you are very welcome.

    #19160

    BlondeyeLaurie
    Participant

    Holy smokes ….this is right interesting… I’ve re-rwad ALL of the posts a few times over…absorbing what everyone has said…and honstly, from my perspective…everyone is “right” in what they explain and in how they feel. It just seems a great shame to have to explain oneself at all really. I’ve never even considered doign the whole DNA thing…but examining my maternal lines I can definatively say that yep…I’m tri-racial…with surnames of Nichols, Jett, Gibson, Perkins, Collins, Cole…how could I not be? LOL I have no clue how to mathematically calculate the percentage of my maternal NA ancestry anymore than I know how to re-build a transmission *eye roll*. It matters not one iota to me. I’ve lived a “primarilly white” existance most of life growing up in OH…but when we woudl go down to the “hills” come summer…we embraced our Native ancestry there…time and place matter I suppose. I never in all my life imagined that I could , let alone would have any Black ancestry but doing this (genealogy research) had led me to a pretty fair conclusion that I quite likely have that genetic linking too….so be it. I think it is all groovy and I can’t wait to learn more about cultures and specifics about families. Inherently, at 40…I now feel like a real mix…which is okay…variety is the “spice of life”…I’d LOVE to attend a pow wow at some comfy point in time…I’ll likely be looked at funny too…I sure don’t “LOOK” the part: I’m blonde, blue eyed and pale as a loaf of wonder bread…but my great granfather was 1/2 Indian…not sure yet which tribe…that is a daunting task…but I really think everyone shoudl continue to embrace the wholedness of wence and from whom we came. It is all fascinating and worthy. Keep up the great work here folks….this is by far the most intriguing and helpful forum I have EVER attended. Race is not unlike religion…we should

    embrace the one that we most identify with(for me, it’s tri-racial)…the one that most aligns with our true self eh? To do otherwise would be hypocritical…and we all know that is not a “good thing”. Good, bad or indifferent, I feel exceedingly grateful for every single thing my ancestors were and did…they got ME here. Blessings to all~~~~Laurie

    #19170

    Red Metis
    Participant

    People’s perception of racial catagories is funny. Have you ever said you were Indian and got the, “You don’t look Indian” response? I think many of us have been lumped with either being black or white no matter who made up our ancestry. It is very rare when someone actually asks me about my race–it’s only happened once that I can remember. I have red hair (it’s always assumed that it’s dye), freckles, flat high cheekbones, beaky nose, etc, etc, but all that is focused on is the red-brown skin and the ‘black’ is checked off. I’ve gotten smart with people and said, ‘I don’t recall you asking my race. you need to ask me before you start marking anything.” They are probably thinking:” You can’t be _________ because you don’t look it” Why do people assume that they can decide who is who and that person has no say?

    The nastiest thing I think, is when people react with shock or surprise when they find out that there are non-black people in a ‘black’ person’s family. Like it’s some sort of miraculous cross-breeding between a cat and dog or something. I HATE THAT.

    #19177

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Spirit

    [B]This is a very strong topic for a long time even now I get somewhat offended when people concieve me as black. I used to complain all the time when I filled out forms that there was no reference to other that you could mark for race they would have black, white, hispanic, even non-hispanic but that was it.

    I have always referred to myself as tri-racial black white and indian no specific order though. I am what I am it just sad that I know nothing about the white part of my history. But I find it hard being accepted on either side. Funny Huh? I mean blacks look at me as white because of my long hair and grain of hair light complexion, but I think it is mostly out of jealousy though. Then whites assume I am black becausde I am not white enough, no blonde hair and blue eyes, this is my perception so I say where is the love?

    Me:

    Here’s something I wrote to a science group on race:

    Race disappears very quickly on a biological basis. It can’t be seen

    in blood work, or genotypes.

    Very late in the 19th century, the idea of race was already ditched by

    scientists. This was before genetic work ups…but the values, lets

    just say skin color, that they used to determine skin color in

    populations, had so much variation even within close relatives, that

    they discarded them. They found that these scales of color only served

    to describe ONE individual person, and the parents and siblings, much

    less the neighbors of an individual, were not on the same scale. This

    was one of the first levels of measurement to go.

    When genetics took off, in the mid 20th century, they also found very

    quickly that the concept of race had no real scientific basis. This is

    pretty easy to see when you consdier that about 92% of your genetic

    makeup, you have in common with chimpanzees, the rest only gives you a

    human form. The differences, genetically, between genders in humans

    only occupy around 10% of your genes…that includes sex choromosomes

    all the way to adipose fat deposits. This doesn’t leave a lot to leave

    a genetic trace between races. In fact, it leaves absolutlely nothing

    on a gene map. If you were reduced to a gene map of you as an

    individual, it wouldn’t be possible to determine what “race” you were.

    This becomes even more complicated when you know that the genes that

    give you a phenotype…that is what you look like despite what

    ressesive genes you carry, are composed of many genetic messages. You

    may carry ressesive genes that have nothing to do with your looks.

    Added to this, within the last 6 years, a whole subtext of genes have

    been discovered that influence what were once considered dominant and

    ressesive genes….in fact they influence it so much that the ideas of

    dominant and ressesive are becoming passe.

    Nowadays, cranial and skeletal morphology is used most, when looking

    at pre and proto human fossils, and in trying to determine relatedness

    in extinct species. Skeletal morphology has a lot of problems. Its

    just one tool. In the absence of better tools, it has to do.

    Faced with the CULTURAL preference of the term “race”, some fringe

    scientists have started using the term Breed….like in a dog

    breed…to try to encompass the visual qualities of people. But this

    isn’t accepted as valid scientifically. It only deals with a phenotype

    ( outward looks), and ignores the genotype ( genetic material of the

    individual including ressesive and dominant traits, as well as the

    subtext which has influenced the phenotype)……I think that you can

    see from this, that the idea of race is a primitive term that

    scientists have rejected over 100 years ago.

    Sadly, much of what I have said is not common knowledge. It very well

    known scientifically, but its not out there for public consumption.

    When talking about closely related populations…that is a group of

    people who have interbred over may hundreds of centuries…there will

    occur a grouping of genes which will repeat…due to dominance

    supported by subtextural genes. These can give a kind of “look” to

    very small pockets of population. When other genes are introduced,

    like genes which are not dominant per se, but have greater frequency of

    passage, it can reintroduce a brand new mix and a new phenotype within

    two generations. Blue eyes are an example of this. The blue eye

    allele has greater frequency than the brown, even though the brown is

    dominant. Added to that, the subtexural genes for eye color will

    present hazel eyes, or another mix, like green which is in fact a co dominant with brown. The subtextural genes for skin

    color are even more volitile. Recently, a chromosomal mutation has been found that produces pale skin, and yet, oriental populations do NOT have this mutation, and they STILL present with pale skin in large areas of population….thus proving that skin color is influenced through a tangle of genetic interaction, which to this day is still not clearly understood.

    I’m glad you mentioned mainland china. If you can recall the results

    of just one generation of a chinese and european mix, you will quickly

    see how the standard “chinese look” is radically changed. The way

    people look is a cultural signal. Its a fixed concept in the minds of

    people. It is often a social force in genetic “engineering” called

    Social Selection. A lot of the products that you see in phenotype are

    socially selected for in terms of frequency. Culturally, certain

    aspects of human phenotype are marginalized. With forces like this in

    operation, it can be difficult to speparate the phenotype from the

    genotype……until you map it. And then it disappears. This is the

    problem with race.

    Lady Stormwalker:

    But as long as I know, that is all that matters but I see the racism in very settle ways all the time. It is so unfortunate though. Well honestly I feel most accepted as Indian so that is what I prefer to use not ignoring the other parts at all. But we as “Indians” know the hardships we have and continue to go through, so I guess there is a mutual understanding and this is where I feel most welcome. 🙂

    Me:

    Me as well. As much talking as we do about this, and about everything…..there is just so much that is mutally understood. And of this things that are nutally understood, to explain them to people who don’t understand, would take books, and plays, and TV serials, and just years of effort. Its nice to be around other people who just know, without having to go through all of that.

    Lynne

    #19201

    Deirdre
    Participant

    Thank you Lynne for the scholarly information. I really needed it after a trying weekend over the subject. I try not to, but I get offended when I am told that I am “exotic” looking by white men. I guess I have issues with color that are not self-imposed. Rather, they have been imposed on me by whites over time. Sad, but true. I don’t want to make whites out to be bad people, it’s just that they project their hang-ups onto others – oft times to their detriment. Going out and gettin burned in the sun abd then running back to show how they are darker than I am. What do I care?! I do care if they get skin cancer though. We’re just so consumed by color in this country. It is inescapable living in America. And hair, oh my goodness. I’m so tired of white women asking me what I do with it. “Do you straighten it?” No. It just is what it is. “Well, how can you be black with hair like that?” Are people really this ignorant? Don’t folks understand what years of miscegenation can produce?

    This weekend. And these are old adults I’m referring to.

    First, somebody was disappointed that I was not Latino. Then, I was called exotic, and I guess I just had a time of it. I don’t wake up thinking “Boy, how Black do I feel today” I am a child of God and a woman first. Womanhood comes first. Why can’t that be enough? Sometimes though, I just want to find a band of BlackIndians and live among them. Yes, I said it. BlackIndians who can relate to being sick and tired of being sick and tired of everyone who is confused about who we are and how we got to be the way we are. I really just want to learn the culture of my people and start incorporating it in my life and my living, but I can’t seem to get to it. I’m still searching for all the pieces. Hmmm, maybe the adversary is trying to keep me from it.

    Lady Stormwalker,

    You mentioned that you feel most accepted as Indian. Your being too black to be white and too light for the comfort level of most blacks. I relate to this. By your photo, you have an African-AMerican appearance. How have you been received by the Native Americans in your area?

    -Deirdre

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 121 total)

The forum ‘Share Genealogy Research’ is closed to new topics and replies.