What's Offensive?

This topic contains 120 replies, has 20,126 voices, and was last updated by  1_optimistic 13 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #19205

    Mousini78
    Participant

    Originally posted by Deirdre

    [B]I try not to, but I get offended when I am told that I am “exotic” looking by white men. I guess I have issues with color that are not self-imposed. Rather, they have been imposed on me by whites over time. Sad, but true. I don’t want to make whites out to be bad people, it’s just that they project their hang-ups onto others – oft times to their detriment. We’re just so consumed by color in this country. It is inescapable living in America. And hair, oh my goodness. I’m so tired of white women asking me what I do with it. “Do you straighten it?” No. It just is what it is. “Well, how can you be black with hair like that?” Are people really this ignorant?

    This weekend. And these are old adults I’m referring to.

    First, somebody was disappointed that I was not Latino. Then, I was called exotic, and I guess I just had a time of it. I don’t wake up thinking “Boy, how Black do I feel today” I am a child of God and a woman first. Womanhood comes first. Why can’t that be enough?

    You have several valid points…but, it’s not just one group that is targeted, sweetie. We had a cleaning lady that was from Sri Lanka and many people mistook her for Mexican…which was not even close. And it’s not just whites…it’s people who are ignorant to how different races of people are…because they have not been exposed to or learned from them. Even I didn’t realize that there are differences between Mexicans, Nicaraguans, and Hondurans until I had known some of them.

    We all have stereotypes to battle, dear…mine is from the opposite side. Tell someone I have NA ancestry and they look at me as if I am crazy because I have “white” skin and had blonde hair when I was little. The average person out there thinks of NA as what they have seen in the movies. I hear that all the time at pow wows from the public watching some of the dancers….”She/he can’t be an Indian, they are white.” What is really important is what is in your heart…your personal relationship, not what others think.

    #19209

    Deirdre
    Participant

    Yes. Absolutely.

    -Deirdre

    #19222

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Deirdre

    [B]Thank you Lynne for the scholarly information.

    Me:

    You’re welcome. Its a shame that more time isn’t spent on teaching some of the facts of biology, specifically genetics….because once people really and truly understand what is going on, maybe they can rethink some of the misconceptions they have about the “facts” of life.

    Deirdre:

    I really needed it after a trying weekend over the subject. I try not to, but I get offended when I am told that I am “exotic” looking by white men.

    Me:

    Sorry to hear that. My guess is they are trying to compliment you….in some kind of wound up Man-Speak. Men have problems with opening lines.

    Deirdre:

    I guess I have issues with color that are not self-imposed.

    Me:

    No, I don’t think you should fear, in any way, that such things are self imposed. It is imposed upon us all. In fact, I doubt that any person, left to their own devices, would come up with the INSANE mutitude of tiny differences between races, that we are all taught to look for, arranged hierarchaclly ( yikes, the spelling..). But we are all taught to do this. Without exception, because we live where we live. Hence, your hair for instance, is throwing them a curve ball.

    Deirdre:

    Rather, they have been imposed on me by whites over time. Sad, but true. I don’t want to make whites out to be bad people, it’s just that they project their hang-ups onto others – oft times to their detriment.

    Me:

    I don’t think that it has escaped the notice of us US citizens, that everybody is checked out for the purposes, potentially if not in fact, of persons to breed with. This is a can of rats that is even more complicated to deal with than simple things like the genetic basis of phenotype. Be yourself and let the chips fall where they may. Let them deal with it.

    Deirdre:

    Going out and gettin burned in the sun abd then running back to show how they are darker than I am. What do I care?! I do care if they get skin cancer though. We’re just so consumed by color in this country.

    Me:

    Yes, we are comnsumed by skin color. Its actually a really complicated genetic factor. Since really pale skin has been found to be a mutation, you can in fact, carry this mutation recessively, and within your children, have it appear dominantly. One thing about mutations though, they tend to predominate. A mutation will often trump the unmutated gene. It rewrites the code. My Dad had a pale olive skin color, my mother was very pale. All of their kids have a very heavy cream color with an underlying yellow tone. The mutation triumphed. My cousins are much darker, because my uncle married an Italian woman. They could pass for motion picture Indians, but I couldn’t.

    Deirdre:

    It is inescapable living in America. And hair, oh my goodness. I’m so tired of white women asking me what I do with it. “Do you straighten it?” No. It just is what it is. “Well, how can you be black with hair like that?” Are people really this ignorant? Don’t folks understand what years of miscegenation can produce?

    Me:

    I think the idea of mixed race is something that most people resist. Thinking about it, I don’t think that they do this naturally, they do it from conditioning. Now I know that people tend to want to choose persons from their own people, and their own background….but I think that the history of this country has tended to separate people into groups, where if left to progress naturally, these groups would have coalesed over time. One factor operating against this coalesence is the continued influx of other cultural groups and people into this country. There has been no period lengthy enough, to form a natural coalesence of groups into a new grouping, where mixed race people can become a foundation people in the population……and as I say this, I quickly have to add that there is in FACT, a foundation population that is of mixed race, however, due to propaganda, this mixed race foundation population is supposed to be invisible. You and I, and about over a million other people are part of this foundation population. But because of prevailing thought, we are anomolies. When in fact, we are really a big majority.

    Deirdre:

    This weekend. And these are old adults I’m referring to.

    First, somebody was disappointed that I was not Latino.

    Me:

    This is an new catagory for people to think about. They are dealing with the mixed race foundation population of a foreign country that has to be intergrated into this country. This process of intergration is just beginning. People don’t know how to react to them. Just watching the media, other people, etc. react to Latinos, what they say about them, and how it differs from region to region, is very interesting to watch. Its like a fast forward example of what went on in the past in this country.

    Deirdre:

    Then, I was called exotic, and I guess I just had a time of it. I don’t wake up thinking “Boy, how Black do I feel today” I am a child of God and a woman first. Womanhood comes first. Why can’t that be enough? Sometimes though, I just want to find a band of BlackIndians and live among them. Yes, I said it.

    Me:

    Chuckle. OK, I can understand about the BlackIndian thing. In fact, there are tribes like that I do believe. It stands to reason…..so many…lets change that to ALL, east coast tribes are heavily mixed. Who they mixed with were a product of where they lived, who lived around them, how much land or money they had, how many were left in their tribe, and the social forces of the period in which they lived. And even before that, as the Indian population dwindled on the east coast, more powerful tribes would actually capture Indians from smaller tribes to incorporate into their own tribe to keep their own numbers up. The Iroqois were infamous for this, and the Saponi were quite frequently taken in, by force, even though the cultural traditions of these two people were quite different. Good book to read on this subject:’Facing East From Indian Country” by Richiter.

    Deirdre:

    BlackIndians who can relate to being sick and tired of being sick and tired of everyone who is confused about who we are and how we got to be the way we are. I really just want to learn the culture of my people and start incorporating it in my life and my living, but I can’t seem to get to it. I’m still searching for all the pieces. Hmmm, maybe the adversary is trying to keep me from it.

    Me:

    Here are some of my thoughts on this. As far as a culture of the the people goes, antique pantomimes and community celebrations are wonderful things. They are fun. They bring harmony and recognition. They are not enough. Learning a dead language and reviving it is also a wonderful thing….I can be a real nerd about dead and obscure languages, I just love them to pieces. But that isn’t enough either, because it will never become a native language.

    You have to have founding ideas, adopt them, and raise the next generation with them. These ideas have to cover personal as well as group conduct. I think that this is what you are looking for, and this is why you are having such a hard time finding it.

    There is some material left, written by Indians; and those people who observed Indians in the colonial period, that give some clues to this code of conduct. They aren’t hard to find. BUT, they are hard to put into practice in modern life. While *you may find it easy, getting together a group of people, be they blackindians, or whatever, is not going to be easy. One reason it won’t be easy is because personal responsibility and group responsibilty is eluding every person in the world today…and that is why there is so much hand wringing about our values, kids, the list goes on. It doesn’t matter how you dress, or what you look like….IF you can get people doing the same things, and striving for the same things……just as a past Union official, I can’t tell you how hard that is, even in a group of people who have signed on for those very reasons.

    I don’t want to interject defeat in such an idea……It can be done. Its just not real easy. I think that one reason we are all here, is to achieve just that.

    Lynne

    #19231

    Linda
    Keymaster

    Lynne, your bents of mind and interests are so much like my own. I need to see more of you.

    #19250

    Red Metis
    Participant

    <<Here are some of my thoughts on this. As far as a culture of the the people goes, antique pantomimes and community celebrations are wonderful things. They are fun. They bring harmony and recognition. They are not enough. Learning a dead language and reviving it is also a wonderful thing….I can be a real nerd about dead and obscure languages, I just love them to pieces. But that isn't enough either, because it will never become a native language.

    You have to have founding ideas, adopt them, and raise the next generation with them. These ideas have to cover personal as well as group conduct. I think that this is what you are looking for, and this is why you are having such a hard time finding it.

    There is some material left, written by Indians; and those people who observed Indians in the colonial period, that give some clues to this code of conduct. They aren’t hard to find. BUT, they are hard to put into practice in modern life. While *you may find it easy, getting together a group of people, be they blackindians, or whatever, is not going to be easy. One reason it won’t be easy is because personal responsibility and group responsibilty is eluding every person in the world today…and that is why there is so much hand wringing about our values, kids, the list goes on. It doesn’t matter how you dress, or what you look like….IF you can get people doing the same things, and striving for the same things……just as a past Union official, I can’t tell you how hard that is, even in a group of people who have signed on for those very reasons.

    I don’t want to interject defeat in such an idea……It can be done. Its just not real easy. I think that one reason we are all here, is to achieve just that.>>

    Lynne, Deirdre and all:

    This is so true!! Too many ask questions about things no one even thought of before. It seems to me that many do not trust their instincts, intuition, or common sense anymore. No foundation to stand on. It’s just been buried–why?

    Like life is being lived as the individual splinters of wood instead of a firm, strong tree.

    You’re right it’s painful; it hurts to go to the underworld, dig out the truths, and return to the surface whole. We have lost the connection to have some of these rituals, customs, and symbolism that had such deep meaning and tied people together in a spiritual way and provided growth and depth to all that participated.

    I think we are trying to be a group–a people, if you will and weave all the parts of us into something meaningful. Something precious–a gift–that can be passed on and on and on. Sifting through to achieve something for all people. I think that it was ignited because all of us were iconoclastic enough to challenge being put in neat, predictable racial catagories. I believe the idea of race is so entrenched, so very powerful that anyone who stands up to ask “why?” won’t stop there but push through into…something I don’t think we have a name for but feel it all the same.

    Just my thoughts….

    Drae aka Red Metis

    #19251

    Deirdre
    Participant

    Red Metis,

    You know, I’ve lived in ignorance for a long time. It wasn’t until I asked the Creator with a humble heart to open my eyes, ears, mind, and heart to the truth of man that I really began to understand history and race relations in America. I am still in the process of understanding people in general. I think that there are many many ignorant people who are satisfied. It suits their comfort level and it’s just o.k. I live in a political town; the nation’s capitol, and I run into so many who fit this description. Some scholars seem to be the only exception.

    You hit the nail on the head. I am looking exactly to reconnect to the teachings of the ancients. To have intangible gifts of the spirit that are precious and meaningful that can be passed on and on and on-for the good of my granchildren’s granchildren. It is coming. This forum is an important step in that process.

    Deirdre

    #19254

    Buffalowm
    Participant

    Hi Everybody,

    I’m not sure if this comment will fit in this thread, but here goes.. I have found that many who are in recognized tribes are doing all the ” politically correct ” things that are required if you are a recognized tribe. I personally feel being an Indian is something that comes from the heart and not by actions. If in your heart you know who you are and if you are an Indian in your heart then your life will reflect that and the recognition will not matter because that is not what makes you an Indian. I know so many people that are members of a recognized tribe and they go to the culture classes and all the right meetings, but their personal life is lived in a non-indian way. The music they listen to and the life they live is not that of our Ancestors. My values and my life reflect who I am. I feel that it dishonors Creator when we choose to stradle the fence (so to speak) in living as an Indian when it is convenient and gets us what we want and living like others so we can fit in in society. When I found out my whole family history (back 300 years) and understood that they all were NA (Saponi,Tuscarora,Blackfoot and Chicahominy) I understood the struggle they had and I would not want to be anything other than what I am. There is one more thing I want to share with you all. I grew up in church and there was always something missing. Since I have began to worship in the ways of our Ancestors my relationship with Creator has been so good. Our people did not have all the worldly distractions and opionions. We had a deep relationship and reverence for Creator. We understood the importance of His creation and were so thankful for all He created for us. We felt the peace and joy with talking to Him one on one and not having to go through a system or mankind to communicate with Grandfather. We understood the importance of respecting Mother Earth, not because the earth was a god to us but because the earth gave us food and so many other things we needed for survival. Our Lakota brothers and sisters honored Wakan Tanka (the buffalo for those who may not know). It wasn’t that they worshipped the animal. They showed great respect and honor because the Bufallo provided food, clothing, shelter, tools and many other things that you have to have to live. Let us go back to the ways of the elders. It will not always be easy with the world as it is today, but remember if we honor Creator, He will bless us and soon we will find the road back is not hard at all.

    Haliwagirl

    #19261

    blackindiangirl
    Participant

    Haliwagirl…..I enjoyed reading your response, it’s so enlightening. I’m one of those who found myself wanting to embrace my ndn side more than my black side and ignore the white traces that pop up here and there. But I realized that both my ndn and black traces were just about equal and I decided that I must embrace all of the mixture, because I want to embrace me. It’s what makes me the special, unique individual that I am.

    Reading Lynne’s and Haliwagirl’s comments about connecting back with the old way we used to live and what’s really important in life, makes me want to draw even closer to my grandmother, before she passes away. She’s 85yrs. old and very fit for her age, but she’s the only grandparent I have left. I want her memories to also be mine and my childrens’.

    Having that spiritual connection with the Creator makes me forget about all of the “hoopla” about our humanistic race. We are who God/Creator made us. We are a beautiful rainbow of colors, and cannot say that He didn’t know what He was doing….we who appreciate Him, find ourselves admiring His handiwork, and are thankful that we are an important dot on His worldwide map. That spiritual link I have with the Father gives me a strong foundation in my life and without it, I would surely fall.

    #19263

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    Originally posted by Linda

    Lynne, your bents of mind and interests are so much like my own. I need to see more of you.

    Always good talking to you, Linda, and in the future, we will be able to see more of each other!

    Lynne

    #19264

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    Originally posted by Haliwagirl

    [B]Hi Everybody,

    I’m not sure if this comment will fit in this thread, but here goes.. I have found that many who are in recognized tribes are doing all the ” politically correct ” things that are required if you are a recognized tribe. I personally feel being an Indian is something that comes from the heart and not by actions. If in your heart you know who you are and if you are an Indian in your heart then your life will reflect that and the recognition will not matter because that is not what makes you an Indian. I know so many people that are members of a recognized tribe and they go to the culture classes and all the right meetings, but their personal life is lived in a non-indian way.

    Hello, Haliwagirl.

    “but their personal life is lived in a non-indian way. “

    This is one of the roots of the problem. It makes me wonder, WHAT they are learning in culture classes? From what I have read, the interactions between members of a community were an important part of Indian culture, and one of the things that Indians were most noted for….by people who wrote about them.

    Haliwagirl:

    The music they listen to and the life they live is not that of our Ancestors. My values and my life reflect who I am. I feel that it dishonors Creator when we choose to stradle the fence (so to speak) in living as an Indian when it is convenient and gets us what we want and living like others so we can fit in in society. When I found out my whole family history (back 300 years) and understood that they all were NA (Saponi,Tuscarora,Blackfoot and Chicahominy) I understood the struggle they had and I would not want to be anything other than what I am. There is one more thing I want to share with you all. I grew up in church and there was always something missing. Since I have began to worship in the ways of our Ancestors my relationship with Creator has been so good. Our people did not have all the worldly distractions and opionions. We had a deep relationship and reverence for Creator. We understood the importance of His creation and were so thankful for all He created for us. We felt the peace and joy with talking to Him one on one and not having to go through a system or mankind to communicate with Grandfather. We understood the importance of respecting Mother Earth, not because the earth was a god to us but because the earth gave us food and so many other things we needed for survival. Our Lakota brothers and sisters honored Wakan Tanka (the buffalo for those who may not know). It wasn’t that they worshipped the animal. They showed great respect and honor because the Bufallo provided food, clothing, shelter, tools and many other things that you have to have to live. Let us go back to the ways of the elders. It will not always be easy with the world as it is today, but remember if we honor Creator, He will bless us and soon we will find the road back is not hard at all.

    Me:

    Good thoughts. When I have read about our ancestors, I have noted that one of their problems…which at the time were recognized by Indian leaders themselves….that the dependance on European trade goods were a detriment to their way of life. They began by deconstructing and adapting goods to their way, as in deconstructing brass kettles to use as arrowheads rather than using the kettle for brewing….and moved gradually into using the goods for what they were created for, but in doing that, within a generation losing the ability to construct arrowheads from stone…..this applied across the board.

    Many of the skills they had perfected over millenia were lost in a short period of time, consequently, they were dependent on trade for basic survival….when in fact previous to this, many Indians had said that they despised the fact that all Europeans lived for was trade. I don’t want to look like a nut case…but you can apply this to modern life quite easily.

    We are all too involved in commerce, AND the attitudes that commerce engenders. This actually covers many walks of life, from Instant Gratification, to Constant Display of Person ( above the inner qualities)….now I admit that much of this is a matter of degree. I’m just saying that the balance has been tipped to an extreme in our current world. Its out of control, and we aren’t the only people to see this. Indian society also did something that we would find VERY hard to do….they worked hard at keeping everyone on a,more or less, level field ecconimically.

    Green Corn ceremonies, and the periodic distribution of goods in celebrations like marriages, were just two examples of this. Without huge ecconomic differences, the effort to behave in a reciprocal manner was easier to maintain. Within certain circumstances, Indians were noted for their charity and concern for other members of the tribe, and even strangers. Few people went hungry. There was not a cut throat attitude.

    In reading statements made by east coast Indians during the early 1700’s, many of them stayed on the east coast and adapted to European society because, as they stated, they loved the land itself, and would not remove themselves to places where they were not beloved, meaning that they did not want to leave country and relatives just to get away from Europeans. Thomas Jefferson wrote that his plan for Indians in this country was to absorb them into the population, to essentially incorporate them and make them “one” with Europeans.

    Previous to the Revolution, Britain and France, who were fighting on the European continent among themselves, and letting it spill over to the Americas, divided the US into empirical territories, and had a written policy to keep their colonists as far away as possible from mixing with Indians….they didn’t want a creole population to deal with. They wanted a colonial population loyal to their country of origin.

    I don’t think that those old empirical attitudes ever really faded. Some of the founding fathers of the US were idealists, some had visions of what they wanted things to be, and some were just guys on the scene that manipulated people to achieve their ends. If immigration to the US had stopped for even 75 years after the revolution, things here would be very different, but it actually increased. They wanted more and more people, they actually gave land away and sent fliers to Europe promising free land. They were going to prevail thru demographics.

    What’s done is done. But with the blessings of hind sight, we can see where to zig when we are being pushed to zag. I think that one of the real values of this forum, is that thoughts about being Indian, an Indian way of life, the modern world, what we can do about it all, goes a lot deeper than just culture classes. We don’t have to prove who and what we are, we already know this for ourselves. We have to thoughtfully have to examine how we can live the way we want, after acknowledging that what we want is to live as Indian people in ways that feel natural to us, yet within the modern world.

    You know, my brother once had a telephone conversation with Mr Richardson of the NC BIA. Mr Richardson asked him what did it mean to him to be an Indian. This is a question that I personally could not answer. Its like being asked what does it mean to me to be a woman. Well, the first thing to occur to me is that I’ve never been anything else so its kinda hard to answer. Its like having two legs……its a good thing.

    Lynne

    #19270

    Linda
    Keymaster

    Yes, there is that longing for ways of being supposedly lost, but, the big question is, what were those ways? The deeper you go in studying all this, the more complex it becomes. There were many cultures, many religions, many languages. Most of what was recorded is about other people who our own families/ancestors had little in common with.

    And some hard facts to face. Most Woodland tribes were not monotheistic. Was ours? If our religion was similar to the Lakota, then at first glance it seems monotheistic, but I suspect to see it clearly, we need to lose our attachment to the Imperialistic notion that anyone not monotheistic is a savage, pagan, barbarian inferior.

    One interesting thought . . . it may be, that as women, we are not supposed to pray to Grandfather, but to Grandmother. For me, that one fits like a glove. Give it a try and see what I mean.

    #19287

    1_optimistic
    Participant

    I am sure that I am going to be shot down for this comment but………I am a born again Christian and I only believe in ONE GOD.

    If anything, Europeans did do something right……they did spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ to my ancestors.

    Erica Lewis:o

    #19291

    lynne pepper
    Participant

    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Linda

    [B]Yes, there is that longing for ways of being supposedly lost, but, the big question is, what were those ways? The deeper you go in studying all this, the more complex it becomes.

    Excellent point!

    Linda:

    There were many cultures, many religions, many languages. Most of what was recorded is about other people who our own families/ancestors had little in common with.

    Me:

    So true, Linda. I have read some little things about the Saponi in NC from the colonial period. (Once I get this book out from the library again, I may be able to quote from it). Some traders that were traveling with the Saponi were asking their quide about religion…they didn’t ask him the kinds of questions that an anthropologist would, they were just checking to see if they were monotheistic. Their guide told them that they did believe in a higher power, and an afterlife. If you were good you went to a place where all was good. If you were bad you went to a place where sour old women ruled and you stayed there until you were allowed to be born on earth again, to see if you could get it right this time. This satisfied the traders to the point where they could say that the Indians believed in god and an afterlife where deeds were punished or rewarded.

    What it doesn’t say is legion. It doesn’t pick up on reincarnation, doesn’t pick up on a second chance to get it right.

    In reading about the Sioux, I am reminded that they believed in a higher power, BUT, they also believed in lesser, natural powers, as in the rain, wind, sun, moon, etc. We know that Indians used these lesser powers in ritual to effect changes. You could call that magic, you could call that prayer. Here we have a system that could well have been in use with our own people. The reason it would escape monotheists is that it is, in fact, two tiered. I should say, Protestant Monotheists, because other Christian sects have saints, and they do form a second tier of godliness.

    Another thing that colonists missed was ancestor veneration. They saw nothing worshipfull about this, but in fact, ancestor veneration is a form of worship. Just about all Indians ever written about venerated their ancestors. This was not a pie in the sky kind of veneration of long dead ancestors….it was that and the veneration of close relations that had died. The graves of your people had holiness. The land was holy because it held the graves of your ancestors as well.

    In contemplating what Hale said about the Tutelo language, that it was an older version of modern Sioun languages, like Sioux, it occurs to me that some of the forms of worship may also be related. Hale did say that the Tutelo had very different ways of living compared to the Iroquios.

    Linda:

    And some hard facts to face. Most Woodland tribes were not monotheistic. Was ours? If our religion was similar to the Lakota, then at first glance it seems monotheistic, but I suspect to see it clearly, we need to lose our attachment to the Imperialistic notion that anyone not monotheistic is a savage, pagan, barbarian inferior.

    Me:

    I may as well say it….christianity is not monotheistic. It completely fails the test in that. Not only do you have “god in three persons”, but depending on what kind of Christianity you espouse, you have the Virgin Mother, and the saints. The fact that protestants don’t worship Mary, as in praying to her….really doesn’t count since they continure to accept the rest of the story about her. You’ll have to excuse me, I am, afterall, an atheist.

    I was readind about how the Iroquios had to translate prayer….and because of the language structure they had to say, “our father, his son, and their holy ghost”, because it wasn’t possible to say the father, the son, and the holy ghost. I think that what the Iroqouis came up with, proves the point.

    Linda:

    One interesting thought . . . it may be, that as women, we are not supposed to pray to Grandfather, but to Grandmother. For me, that one fits like a glove. Give it a try and see what I mean.

    Me:

    Heh. Personally, I talk to the wind. 🙂

    Lynne

    #19296

    Buffalowm
    Participant

    Erica,

    The “Church World” today is nothing like what the europeans brought to america. The church today has little to do with Creator or Jesus. Our people probally excepted the europeans way of things because they may not have been to far from what we believed anyway. The focus in the church today is MONEY. Creator and Jesus have no place there anymore. Money is a god. Our people reverenced Creator and all of His creation. If you want to talk about Jesus, think about how is lived His life. He truly lived like an indian. You would have to understand the indian culture to really see how much worship has changed and how far from Creator we have really come.

    This is my humble native opinion.

    Haliwagirl

    #19304

    Deirdre
    Participant

    Hello All,

    I finally took the opportunity to visit the Monacan nation. Very small. The meeting house and cultural building was closed, but I met the man responsible for providing most of the history, etc. Guided by spirit, it was a really good visit. Later over the weekend, I took my mother back to her birth place in Elon (Monacan country) and there she told me that not only was she bobrn there, but my grandfather on my father’s side was also born there and that my mother’s grandmother performed a lot of mid wife work in Elon,VA during the 19th century. Anyway, I did not initially feel very welcome, but after talking openly Twohawks told me that I looked like his sister:) and that he would lend himself to helping me track my people. I hope that this relationship remains guided by the Creator and remains positive. He assured me that the journey would take time and might prove touchy, but I’m willing to find out the truth-whatever it might be.

    Tucked in the Blue Ridge mountains, Monacan country is beautiful. My father lives on a lake in Virginia. Whenever I paln to vacation, I am always looking for the serrenity of a quiet lake. This weekend I went to the clearing at Monacan Statte Park and found just that. Geese that were gentle, even foxes unaffraid. I felt so at peace. I’ve been invited to the sweat lodge. I was also invited to Pow Wow this May. I am so excited about the direction I think my life is about to go in. I’ve been asking the spirit to guide me back to who I really am. I’ve been living a stressed, false assimilation life and a serious change is needed. I believe my well being depends on it.

    I got the feeling that the current Monacan Nation is mostly Native and Caucasian. He told me that there is also African, but few want to recognize it; but that won’t deter me. If any of it is in me, I want to know. Oh, also, he does not believe in the DNA testing. He believes more in the oral history. We’ll see how it all goes. I hope that my online Saponi family will remain supportive to my efforts.

    Peace and blessing to you all;)

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